Podcasts: Trinity Staff Post-graduate seminars

Trinity’s ongoing series of staff post-graduate seminars now has podcasts available for this term’s papers by Dr. Brendan O’Connell (TCD) on The Book of the Governor, and Dr Jesse Lander (Notre Dame) on Hamlet & Horripilation.

For the full schedule of talks, see staffpostgraduate14.wordpress.com

Fellows at Dublin’s Marsh’s Library share their research: Gabor Gelleri

Marsh’s Library currently has a fascinating series of posts on its website. Scholars who have been visiting Fellows at Marsh’s over the last year share what they have been working on at the Dublin rare books library and disclose some of their findings in the archives. It’s a wonderful spotlight on one of Ireland’s most important scholarly resources and reveals the unique riches available there.

In a few posts over the coming weeks, we’ll share links to these glimpses of scholarly detective work in Irish archives.

 

This week, in our final link to this series of posts on the Marsh’s Library website, Gabor Gelleri takes us “On the trail of a mysterious Renaissance manuscript”. He explains its link to Marsh’s and leaves us on a cliffhanger, noting that the “[t]he ‘hunt’ for this important manuscript is still ongoing”.

Internship: Marsh’s Library

Marshs

Marsh’s Library is looking for an intern to work in our Rare Books Reading Room. The successful candidate will already have a postgraduate library qualification, and will gain valuable experience in:

– supervising academic readers and students

– cataloguing of rare books

– handling and retrieval of rare books

– dealing with general library administrative duties

– using social media to promote a cultural attraction

The internship is offered as part of the Jobbridge programme.
If you would like more details please see http://tinyurl.com/oybznfu

Closing date for applications is 28 November 2014 at 5pm.

Details available here.

CFP: European Women in Early Modern English Drama

ESRA (University of Worcester UK) 29 June-2 July, 2015

Katherine of Aragon

European Women in Early Modern English Drama

Organizers:
Edel Semple (University College Cork), Ema Vyroubalova (Trinity College Dublin)

Topic: 
The seminar explores why and how early modern England’s dramatists repeatedly fashioned female characters of distinct nationalities and how notions of gender and foreignness intersect and/or diverge in early modern English play-texts. The papers may examine, among other aspects, representations of European women in early modern English drama in relation to:

– social, sexual, or cultural encounters and interactions
– notions and theories of race, ethnicity, and hybridity
– misogyny and/or xenophobia
– political and/or economic power
– linguistic exchange (e.g. accents or multilingualism)
– religious and/or social identities and groups
– early modern travel, geography and cartography
– early modern staging
– printing and circulation of plays
– source texts and dramatic genres

Submit an abstract (200-300 words) and a biography (150 words) by 1 December 2014 to the conveners. Participants will be notified about the acceptance of their proposals by 1 March 2015. The deadline for submitting completed seminar papers (3,000 words) is 1 May 2015.

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IRS: Renaissance Pedagogies

RENAISSANCE PEDAGOGIES

IRS Pedagogies

Saturday November 22nd, 2014, 1.30pm

J208, John Henry Newman Building, School of English, Drama and Film, UCD

1.30 – 2               Welcome (tea and coffee)

2 – 3                    KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Professor Jennifer Richards (University of Newcastle)

“Pronunciation, performance and the politics of the schoolroom”

3 – 3.30              Refreshments

3.30 – 4.30           PANEL SESSION (Chair: Dr. Ema Vyroubalova, TCD)

Colin Lahive (UCD): “’to repair the ruins of our first parents’: Milton’s pedagogy and the ‘end’ of all learning”

Jason Harris (UCC): “Ex tempore Composition in the Renaissance Latin Classroom”

Rosalinde Schut (UCD): “’A True and Readie Way to Learne’: The role of pedagogy in early Restoration Ireland”

4.30 – 5               Roundtable discussion on Renaissance pedagogy and contemporary practice (Facilitator: Professor Danielle Clarke, UCD)

Supported by the Society for Renaissance Studies

If you wish to join the dinner afterwards, please contact Danielle Clarke (danielle.clarke@ucd.ie)

Fellows at Dublin’s Marsh’s Library share their research: Timothy Dale Walker

Marsh’s Library currently has a fascinating series of posts on its website. Scholars who have been visiting Fellows at Marsh’s over the last year share what they have been working on at the Dublin rare books library and disclose some of their findings in the archives. It’s a wonderful spotlight on one of Ireland’s most important scholarly resources and reveals the unique riches available there.

In a few posts over the coming weeks, we’ll share links to these glimpses of scholarly detective work in Irish archives.

In this post, Timothy Dale Walker tells us about Willem Piso and his “groundbreaking seventeenth-century work that described Brazilian flora and fauna”, with beautiful illustrations.

Fellows at Dublin’s Marsh’s Library share their research: Paris O’Donnell

Marsh’s Library currently has a fascinating series of posts on its website. Scholars who have been visiting Fellows at Marsh’s over the last year share what they have been working on at the Dublin rare books library and disclose some of their findings in the archives. It’s a wonderful spotlight on one of Ireland’s most important scholarly resources and reveals the unique riches available there.

In a few posts over the coming weeks, we’ll share links to these glimpses of scholarly detective work in Irish archives.

In this post, Paris O’Donnell talks about working on 15th-century books at Marsh’s Library.

 

She includes some intriguing photographs of annotations, including this sketch of a long-haired figure, which “illustrates an episode in which Pope Anicetus reportedly decreed that no priest should wear his hair long”. She notes that “[a] few pages later, the annotator has drawn a latrine, illustrating the location in which, according to the text, Arius (who gave his name to the heretical doctrine of Arianism) came to a very messy end!”