Irish Renaissance Seminar at UCD – “Conflict and Contestation in the Early Modern World “

The first meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar for 2017 will be held on Saturday 22nd April in the School of English, Drama and Film, University College Dublin.

The theme for this meeting is Conflict and Contestation in the Early Modern World. The meeting will convene in Room J207-8, John Henry Newman Building, UCD, and the schedule is as follows:

1-1:30pm: Welcome

1:30-3:00pm: Panel
Chair: Dr Jane Grogan

Dr Marc Caball (UCD): ‘Hugh O’Neill and his Gaelic and Renaissance Cultural Context’

Professor Andrew Hadfield (Sussex): ‘James Shirley’s The Politician: Anglo-Irish Literature and Politics in the 1630s’

Dr Ann-Maria Walsh (UCD): ‘The Boyle Sisters and the Familial Correspondence Network: A Life-Line in Times of Civil Strife and Beyond’

3:00-3:30pm: Refreshments

3:30-4:30: Keynote
Chair: Dr Colin Lahive

Professor Nicholas McDowell (Exeter): ‘The Poetics of Civil War: Shakespeare to Marvell (to W.B.Yeats)’

4:30-5:00: Roundtable
Convener: Dr Naomi McAreavey

Early Modern Studies in Ireland: Current Locations, Future Directions

6:30: Dinner

The event is generously supported by the School of English, Drama and Film, UCD, and the Society for Renaissance Studies.

For further details on this meeting of the IRS, contact Dr Colin Lahive (colin.lahive@ucd.ie)

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Tudor & Stuart Ireland interdisciplinary Conference – CFP

The 7th Annual Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference will be held at the Moore Institute, National University of Ireland, Galway, on 18-19 August 2017.

This year’s programme will feature plenary addresses by Prof. Patricia Palmer (Maynooth University) and Prof. Chris Maginn (Fordham University), as well as a special panel session, ‘Visualising Early Modern Ireland’.

The Call for Papers for this year’s conference is now open.  Proposals for papers (20 min.) are now welcome on any aspect of Ireland or the Irish abroad during the Tudor and Stuart periods. Postgraduates, postdoctoral scholars, early-career researchers, independent researchers, and scholars from the disciplines of English, Irish, History, Archaeology, Art History, Theology, Philosophy, Music, Digital Humanities, and Irish Studies are particularly welcome to submit proposals for consideration. Proposals that include an interdisciplinary element are strongly encouraged.  The Call for Papers will close on Friday, 14 April 2017.

This year’s conference is organised by Evan Bourke (English, NUI Galway), Raina Howe (History, NUI Galway), Ioanna Kyvernitou (English, NUI Galway) and Matt McGinty (History, NUI Galway).

Should you have any questions regarding the 2017 conference, please do not hesitate to contact the organisers at 2017@tudorstuartireland.com.

As details of the 2017 conference become available, they will be posted on the Tudor and Stuart Ireland website and Twitter (@tudorstuartire).

Acknowledgements: The 7th Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference is generously supported by the College of Arts, Social Sciences & Celtic Studies, NUI Galway, the Moore Institute, NUI Galway, the Discipline of English, NUI Galway, the Discipline of History, NUI Galway and Marsh’s Library.

[From the Tudor and Stuart Ireland website.]

Public lecture: “Book History and the Digital Humanities”

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06 March 2017, 17:00
Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin

“Book History and the Digital Humanities”

A public lecture by Professor Alexander Wilkinson (University College Dublin) as part of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History Research Seminar Series 2016-17.

 

Seminar Series: Trinity Centre for Early Modern History

The Trinity Centre for Early Modern History promotes understanding of the culture, society, economy, religion, politics and warfare of early modern Europe. The Centre organises seminars, conferences and public lectures on the early modern history of Ireland, Britain and Continental Europe, as well as on relations between European and non-European states and cultures.

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Below is the programme of Seminars held every Monday at 5pm in the Trinity Long Room Hub:

  • 23 January 2017 | Brian Brewer (TCD) | Quixotic Economics: Early Modern Economic Theory and Political Economy in Cervantes’s Don Quixote.
  • 30 January 2017 | Robert Appelbaum (Uppsala University) | Early Modern Terrorism: an Introduction.
  • 6 February 2017 | William O’Reilly (University of Cambridge) | The emperor who wanted to be king. HRE Charles VI in Spain and Germany, 1685-1740.
  • 13 February 2017 | Joel Halcomb (University of East Anglia) | The Dublin Convention of 1658 and the Fall of the Protectorate.
  • 20 February 2017 | Aileen Douglas (TCD) | Round Hand Character: script, commerce, and nation, 1690-1750.
  • 6 March 2017 | Alexander Wilkinson (University College Dublin) | Book History and the Digital Humanities.
  • 13 March 2017 | Malcolm Gaskill (University of East Anglia) | Witchcraft, Emotion and Social Change in Seventeenth-Century New England.
  • 20 March 2017 | Michael Braddick (Sheffield University) | The sufferings of John Lilburne (1615-1657): martyrology and the freeborn Englishman.
  • 27 March 2017 | Sophie Hingst, (TCD) | One phenomenon. Three perspectives. English colonial strategies in Ireland revisited, ca. 1607- 1680.

For further details of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History, please www.tcd.ie/history/research/centres/early-modern/

The Centre also helpfully archives many of their talks, available on the website

Public lecture, TCD, 5 December 2016: “Sex, Lies and Rigged Returns: The 1634 Kerry Election and its Consequences”, Dr Bríd McGrath

5 December 2016 | 17:00
Trinity Long Room Hub

Sex, Lies and Rigged Returns: The 1634 Kerry Election and its Consequences

A public lecture by Dr Bríd McGrath (TCD) as part of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History 2016-17 Research Seminar Series.

Details of the full seminar series here.

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