Public lecture: ‘Gunpowder and Perfume: The Poetry of John Donne’ – SRS 50th anniversary

The Society for Renaissance Studies is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a series of lectures in Ireland and the UK in early September, on the theme of the five senses.

You are warmly invited to attend the Dublin lecture, by Prof. Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin (Ireland Professor of Poetry) on ‘Gunpowder and Perfume: The Poetry of John Donne’, which takes place at the National Library of Ireland on Wednesday 13th September at 7pm.

John Donne portrait

John Donne

Prof. Ní Chuilleanáin is the seventh Ireland Professor of Poetry and her appointment was announced by President Michael D. Higgins in May 2016. Born in Cork, Prof. Ní Chuilleanáin is an award-winning poet and the author of numerous poetry collections.

Founded in 1967, the SRS “provides a national, and international forum for all those – whether academics, independent scholars, postgraduates and undergraduates, school teachers and students, or members of the general public – who have an interest in any aspect of the study of the Renaissance” (source: SRS website).

Public lecture: “Book History and the Digital Humanities”

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06 March 2017, 17:00
Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin

“Book History and the Digital Humanities”

A public lecture by Professor Alexander Wilkinson (University College Dublin) as part of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History Research Seminar Series 2016-17.

 

Seminar Series: Trinity Centre for Early Modern History

The Trinity Centre for Early Modern History promotes understanding of the culture, society, economy, religion, politics and warfare of early modern Europe. The Centre organises seminars, conferences and public lectures on the early modern history of Ireland, Britain and Continental Europe, as well as on relations between European and non-European states and cultures.

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Below is the programme of Seminars held every Monday at 5pm in the Trinity Long Room Hub:

  • 23 January 2017 | Brian Brewer (TCD) | Quixotic Economics: Early Modern Economic Theory and Political Economy in Cervantes’s Don Quixote.
  • 30 January 2017 | Robert Appelbaum (Uppsala University) | Early Modern Terrorism: an Introduction.
  • 6 February 2017 | William O’Reilly (University of Cambridge) | The emperor who wanted to be king. HRE Charles VI in Spain and Germany, 1685-1740.
  • 13 February 2017 | Joel Halcomb (University of East Anglia) | The Dublin Convention of 1658 and the Fall of the Protectorate.
  • 20 February 2017 | Aileen Douglas (TCD) | Round Hand Character: script, commerce, and nation, 1690-1750.
  • 6 March 2017 | Alexander Wilkinson (University College Dublin) | Book History and the Digital Humanities.
  • 13 March 2017 | Malcolm Gaskill (University of East Anglia) | Witchcraft, Emotion and Social Change in Seventeenth-Century New England.
  • 20 March 2017 | Michael Braddick (Sheffield University) | The sufferings of John Lilburne (1615-1657): martyrology and the freeborn Englishman.
  • 27 March 2017 | Sophie Hingst, (TCD) | One phenomenon. Three perspectives. English colonial strategies in Ireland revisited, ca. 1607- 1680.

For further details of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History, please www.tcd.ie/history/research/centres/early-modern/

The Centre also helpfully archives many of their talks, available on the website

Public lecture, TCD, 5 December 2016: “Sex, Lies and Rigged Returns: The 1634 Kerry Election and its Consequences”, Dr Bríd McGrath

5 December 2016 | 17:00
Trinity Long Room Hub

Sex, Lies and Rigged Returns: The 1634 Kerry Election and its Consequences

A public lecture by Dr Bríd McGrath (TCD) as part of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History 2016-17 Research Seminar Series.

Details of the full seminar series here.

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Talk: The Renaissance of Not Doing Things, Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray

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School of English, Drama and Film, UCD present

Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray (University of British Columbia, Canada)

“The Renaissance of Not Doing Things”

 

We typically describe the English Renaissance as a time of frantic activity, both in England and, increasingly, on a global scale. The other side of all this activity is a fascination with inactivity. Many writers of this period express a desire not to do anything.This desire often finds expression as the wish to become a plant or a work of art. I’m interested in how our sense of the Renaissance changes if we see Narcissus as the paradigmatic figure

Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray is Professor of English at the University of British Columbia. He specializes in Renaissance poetry and queer theory, and is the author of three monographs and numerous essays and journal articles.

 

This talk takes place at 4.30pm, Thursday 24th November in J208, Newman building, UCD

All Welcome!