Lecture: “Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting”, TCD, 9 November, 1pm

'Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting'

“Tremulous Hands: Tracing Diseases and Disorders in Medieval Handwriting”

Thursday, 9 November 2017, 1 – 2pm
Trinity Long Room Hub

Presented by Dr Deborah Thorpe Visiting Marie Sklodowska-­Curie Fellow,
Trinity Long Room Hub, with discussant Prof Brendan Kelly, Dept of
Psychiatry, TCD.

About Medical and Health Humanities

The Trinity College Dublin Medical and Health Humanities Initiative brings together researchers from a wide range of disciplines including history, philosophy, sociology, drama, health sciences, religion, cultural studies, arts, literature and languages.These events offer the opportunity to see medicine through the eyes of academics who are concerned with literary, historical, philosophical, aesthetic and technological perspectives of health, illness, disability and practice.

Campus LocationTrinity Long Room Hub
Accessibility: Yes
Room: Neill Lecture Theatre
Event Type: Alumni, Arts and Culture, Courses, Library, Public
Type of Event: One-time event
Audience: Undergrad, Postgrad, Alumni, Faculty & Staff, Public

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Lecture: “Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman”, TCD, 7 November, 6.30pm

Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman

Beyond the Book of Kells: Piers Plowman

Tuesday, 7 November 2017, 6:30 – 8pm
Trinity College Long Room Hub

This lecture is part of a series entitled “Beyond the Book of Kells: The stories of eight other medieval manuscripts from the library of Trinity College Dublin.”

In this second talk of the series, Professor Simon Horobin from the University of Oxford will discuss TCD MS 212. This manuscript contains what is perhaps the great medieval English poem, William Langland’s Piers Plowman, an astonishingly rich and searching exploration of what it takes to live rightly in a society corrupt and corrupting. As befits a work of its quality, the poem survives in over fifty manuscripts; this, one of two in Trinity’s collection, is especially significant for containing early biographical information about the poet himself.

Further Information

To over 600,000 visitors a year, Trinity is synonymous with the Book of Kells. But that ninth-century manuscript is only part of the story. Ranging in date from the fifth century to the sixteenth, and with origins from across Western Europe, Trinity’s six hundred medieval manuscripts contain languages from Latin and Greek to Old Irish, Old English, Welsh, German, Dutch, Spanish, Italian, Provencal, and Vaudois. The texts embody in microcosm the entire gamut of medieval thought. This series of lectures from manuscript experts – Irish and international – will offer the public an opportunity to encounter eight other extraordinary books from Trinity’s collections, from the ninth-century Book of Armagh to a key manuscript of one of the great medieval English poets, William Langland.

The “Beyond the Book of Kells” lecture series is lead by Dr Mark Faulkner of Trinity College’s School of English. It is held as part of the Manuscript, Print, and Book Cultures research theme, in association with the Trinity Long Room Hub, the Faculty of Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences, and the Library of Trinity College Dublin.

The manuscripts have been digitised to coincide with this lecture series.  For more information, please click here.

Campus LocationTrinity Long Room Hub
Accessibility: Yes
Room: Neill Lecture Theatre
Research Theme: Manuscript, Book and Print Culture
Event Type: Arts and Culture, Lectures and Seminars, Library, Public
Type of Event: One-time event
Audience: Undergrad, Postgrad, Alumni, Faculty & Staff, Public
Cost: Free
Contact Name: Mark Faulkner
Contact Emailmark.faulkner@tcd.ie
More infowww.tcd.ie…

Call for Papers: Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference, Maynooth University

Thursday, 5 July 2018, 09:00 – Sunday, 8 July 2018, 22:00
Department of Music, Logic House, Maynooth University

Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference: Call for papers (deadline for proposals 4 December 2017)

The Music Department at Maynooth University is pleased to host the 2018 Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference. The Conference will take place from 5th to 8th July 2018, it is envisaged that  we will be able to include c.170 papers.

We welcome papers and themed session on any relevant topic, from performing and recording early music in the twenty-first century, to madrigal studies, sources studies, analytical studies, medieval and renaissance music in Ireland, to mention only a few. In view of recent political events and across the world, however, as a committee, we would like to suggest at least one topic and create space to consider the politics around researching, teaching and performing Med & Ren music in a time when racists, white nationalists (not only in the US) and xenophobes feel emboldened. How do we teach Med & Ren music courses that do not appear to be safe havens for white supremacists? That challenge ahistorical views of Med & Ren as all white (male) and Christian? What resources do we need? What stories are we not telling? What does intersectional, postcolonial, and/or anti-racist research, teaching and music-making look like or sound like in our field? What are the structural barriers to inclusivity and diversity in our field, and what can we do to remove them? We feel this is an important topic for our research fields, but it is not intended as a conference theme in any restrictive way and we would like to stress of course, that all themes and topics will be considered with equal interest.

Possible formats of presentation include, but are not limited to:

  • individual papers of 20 minutes
  • paired papers (60 minutes including QA)
  • themed sessions (120 minutes for 4 papers and 90 minutes for 3 papers, including QA)
  • round tables
  • workshops/ lecture-recitals
  • posters
  • short 10-minute presentations

Conference languages: German, English, French, Italian, Spanish

All proposals should include:

  • title
  • indication of format
  • proposer’s name
  • proposer’s affiliation (if any)
  • names and affiliations of any additional participants
  • contact email
  • AV requirements
  • a short bio or bios of the participants (max. 15 lines; this has no bearing on the evaluation but simply for distribution to chairs)

Abstract:

  • for individual contributions : c. 250 words
  • for sessions with multiple participants: c. 200 words on the proposal as a whole, and c. 100 words on the contribution of each participant

Deadline for all proposals: 4 December 2017.

Notification of acceptance: by 31 January 2018.

Proposals to be submitted to MedRen2018@mu.ie

General Information

The committee would like to support academic parenting. As such, a room with a fridge will be available as lactation room. The room is located on the first floor of Logic House (accessible via staircases),  the same building where the main sessions will take place.

Committee

Antonio Cascelli (Maynooth University, Ireland)
Eleanor Giraud (University of Limerick, Ireland)
Frank Lawrence (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Melanie Marshall (University College Cork, Ireland)
Thomas Schmidt (University of Manchester/ University of Huddersfield)

For information contact: MedRen2018@mu.ie

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Prof. Janet Clare, “Cosmography and the Early Modern Literary Imagination”

Seminar Series Clare
Department of English Seminar at Maynooth University
Professor Janet Clare (Hull), “Cosmography and the Early Modern Literary Imagination”
When: Wednesday, November 8, 2017, 16:00 to 17:30
Where: Iontas Seminar Room, Ground Floor, Iontas Building, Maynooth University

 

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Review: King Lear at dlr Mill Theatre, Dundrum

king-lear-2017-db_6907-e1504614670795

King Lear, Mill Productions, dlr Mill Theatre, directed by Geoff O’Keeffe

This production opens with pulsating music, flashes of light, and three gyrating figures moving under the sway of some mesmeric force, so that for a few startling moments you might be at a production of Macbeth rather than King Lear. These are not the weird sisters, however, but Goneril, Regan, and Cordelia who face away from the audience towards a large structure upstage while human actors transformed into wolves snarl and weave around them. Suddenly the stage lights are reversed, dazzling the audience, and the actors’ faces turn to the back of the auditorium: the King is entering.

The large structure ­– half set and half stage property – resembles part of a huge crown with three spikes each jutting in a separate direction, the whole piece off-centre and its balance slightly off-kilter. In the centre is a throne, empty at first, then occupied by Lear, and later hovered over, circled, and sat on by various other characters. This is clearly a disturbed kingdom where powerful forces have gone askew, where there is splintering rather than unity, and where a sense of preternatural menace hums beneath the institutions of state, family, and marriage. It is quickly understood, then, that the sisters’ dance is not an expression of communion but of compulsion and disharmony.

Mill Productions is the production wing of dlr Mill Theatre and this production of King Lear is part of their “education outreach”. When I attended on opening night last Wednesday, about half the audience were a school group who seemed engaged in the performance throughout. The production does a good job of communicating the plot and character relationships clearly without condescending to the viewer at any point, and of showing how the visual and aural language of theatre generate the play’s meaning as it is lifted off the page. A number of characters are played by the same actor, as they would have been in Shakespeare’s time, but this doubling was never confusing.

It was also made use of artistically in the case of the choice to double the parts of Cordelia and the Fool, played by Clodagh Mooney Duggan. There has been speculation since the nineteenth century about whether the roles – which are never simultaneously on stage – might originally have been doubled. This production seemed to encourage us to consider in parallel how Cordelia and the Fool relate to Lear, challenging but loving him, and the first half ends with the Fool in tears and alone taking off his coxcomb hat to reveal more clearly that this was also Cordelia’s face. Such a choice does pose certain obstacles, however, and perhaps hampered the development of both characters.

I enjoyed the cool malice of Sharon McCoy’s multifaceted Goneril who managed to be both fragile and terrible. Philip Judge succeeded in presenting a Lear who was clearly deeply flawed at the same time as sympathetic. When he laid his head in the Fool’s lap and implored “O let me not be mad, not mad”, his desperation and vulnerability were heartrending. So too was his later admission to Cordelia that “to deal plainly / I fear I am not in my perfect mind”, where the gentle cautiousness of the delivery alongside the situation’s absurdity made it truly moving. It was these moments of pathos for humanity as the trappings of civility are eroded, even as we recognise human culpability, that stayed with me after I left the theatre.

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King Lear runs at dlr Mill Theatre until 28 October with nearly daily matinée performances at 10am and 1.30pm. Contact the Box Office for 10am and 1.30pm performances please – info@milltheatre.ie / 01-2969340. There will be evening performances at 7.30pm on Wednesday 25th October and Thursday 26th October.

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