Theatre: The Merchant of Venice at St. Enda’s Park, Dublin

merchant-of-venice-poster-250px

21–24 June 2017, 8pm

Balally Players takes Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice to St. Enda’s Park Grange Road, Rathfarnham, Co. Dublin for its Summer Shakespeare 2017 presentation.

The play, directed by Fiona Walsh, will be performed outdoors in the Walled Garden, St. Enda’s Park from 21 to 24 June 2017. The performance starts at 8pm each evening and tickets (€14/€12) may be booked at the Mill Theatre Box Office (01-296 9340) or on the Mill Theatre website.

For further details go to www.balallyplayers.com

Review: “The Bed” at the Cork Midsummer Festival

Guest post by Emer Murphy

As the most celebrated playwright ever to put ink to paper, it remains astonishing that so little is known about William Shakespeare’s personal life. However, in an imaginative and intriguing one-act play, as part of the Cork Midsummer Festival, Ger FitzGibbon, former head of Drama and Theatre Studies in UCC, delves into the sparse facts of Shakespeare’s private life, a life in Stratford-Upon-Avon. The Bed, a one-woman play co-directed by FitzGibbon and Jack Healy, gives the stage to Shakespeare’s widow, Anne Hathaway, as she reflects on the life of her late husband, and reacts to the contents of his will in the aftermath of his death.

Shakespeare Will and Testament

Shakespeare’s will (1616)

Starring Paula McGlinchey (who has featured in previous Shakespeare productions as well as in BBC’s Line of Duty), the play is set in April 1616, and takes place in the bedchamber Shakespeare once shared with his wife. This setting helps to separate the private man from the celebrated playwright who wrote for the London theatres and the court. The play serves as a platform for the wife and the life Shakespeare left at home in the country and it is Hathaway’s subjectivity which maintains the focus. Performed in Cork’s Unitarian Church, the unique, limited capacity space offers a more intimate scene for Hathaway’s reminiscing as the audience forms an L-shape in close proximity to the stage, allowing us to intrude on the private thoughts of the protagonist, thereby creating a bond between the subject and the audience and placing us firmly on Hathaway’s side.

2006AK4662_2500

Oak bed c.1650-1700 – image copyright Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Having bequeathed most of his belongings to his eldest daughter Susanna, Shakespeare leaves Hathaway with his “second best bed”, an object which dominates the stage. The playing space itself takes on the shape of a large-four poster bed as single wooden shafts stand at the four corners, anchoring a cloth canopy above the stage, effectively mirroring a bed. The action of the play, therefore, whether intended or not, takes place on a bed, firmly confining it to the private sphere between a husband and wife. Within this domestic space, Hathaway frequently addresses her dead spouse and remembers their more intimate moments together, along with the challenges their marriage faced.

Issues of widowhood and the social alterations and ambiguities that accompany it are addressed in the play, raising concerns about the reality of a widow’s legal rights. McGlinchey’s powerful performance combines light and dark, despair and humour, and sees both laughter and tears as she commands the stage, displaying a range of emotions as she tries to adjust to the reality of her husband’s death and her changed situation, where “widows [are] shoved off into corners”. Now relegated to a lesser room in the house, she is left eating cold mutton and barley with no spoon!

She portrays moments of deep, silent contemplation along with occasions of loud, emotional outbursts as she recounts the death of their son, Hamnet, along with an array of both turbulent and blissful episodes in their marriage. Challenges such as his mother’s belief that Anne had “snared her innocent [son]” shadowed their union. Other personal insights into their relationship make Shakespeare all the more human for the audience as Anne recalls how it infuriated her when he would write down her words when she was “trying to have a fight with [him]” after his long periodical absences from home.

Shakespeare's_family_circle - German engraving 19th c

Shakespeare’s family circle – engraving by unknown German engraver, c.1890

Despite their differences, however, their marriage was not completely clouded in darkness and pain, as she remembers fondly their more affectionate moments picking blackberries, and “playing and making lewd verses”. Her discovery that he kept her apple-wood whistle brings a shadowy smile to her lips and softens her resolve as she realises that he brought mementos of her to London, adding to the dynamic of her grief. Her tenderness, however, is short-lived and replaced with a knowing scoff as she acknowledges how it has “dried out from lack of use”. Such contrasting emotions heighten the already poignant atmosphere as other such personal memories pour out as she remembers the intricacies of their marriage.

The raw emotional scenes of the play are complimented by Irene Buckley’s original music scores, which alter the atmosphere dramatically. The music heralds a shift in mood for Hathaway, seeing her transported to a distant memory from the past. At one point in the production, soft, tranquil music begins to echo as her eyes glisten with oncoming tears while she recalls the summer they married. The music cuts unexpectedly and anger replaces grief as she shouts “get out of my head”; she is a woman in mourning and McGlinchey’s performance depicts this in a moving manner.

Twelfth Night Folio

Twelfth Night – Folio

One of the more notable features of the play, however, is the repeated references to some of Shakespeare’s most famed work. Hathaway accounts for aspects of their lives that inspired the plot of plays, including Twelfth Night. The appropriation of this comedy serves to make Shakespeare’s grief for his dead son all the more real as he determines to provide a happy ending for his family who “all teared up” when the twins are reunited. Hathaway details how the play held a special significance for their daughter, Judith, who was driven to near madness after her twin’s death. Noting that many of her husband’s plays were characterised by loss and confusion, Anne provides a glimpse into the personal motivation that influenced him. The Merchant of Venice is echoed loudly in the play with the discovery of a chest that Shakespeare left under the bed, containing an assortment of treasures and keepsakes, amongst which hides a lost play. Naturally, Hamlet also earns a reference when a mask recalling Yorick’s skull is found. Numerous other plays are woven into the plot and quoted from throughout, including Antony and Cleopatra, As You Like It and King Lear, reminding us of the renowned playwright who has inspired Anne’s tears and anger.

The 65 minute production effectively portrayed the multi-faceted journey of grief and the range of emotions that accompany it.

Guest post by Emer Murphy, postgraduate student on the MA Texts and Contexts: Medieval to Renaissance at University College Cork.

“Creation and Reception: Corcadorca’s Live Archive” – The Merchant of Venice (2005) – exhibition and roundtable

The collaborative project “Creation and Reception: Corcadorca’s Live Archive” funded by UCC’s DUETS / College of Arts and Celtic Studies and Social Sciences Creative Practice Support Fund and led by Dr. Anne Etienne (School of English, UCC) and Corcadorca Theatre Company, has generated a series of events based around Corcadorca’s production of The Merchant of Venice. The emblematic run was part of the ambitious Relocation project, spearheaded by Corcadorca, which formed part of the programme of the Cork European Capital of Culture in 2005.

Dr. Anne Etienne and Corcadorca welcome feedback from the audiences of The Merchant of Venice in 2005 to construct a live archive of the theatre company. If you attended the performances, please contact them at merchantofvenice2005@gmail.com and come to the two events:

Revisiting The Merchant of Venice 2005, a site-specific exhibition, opens on Wednesday July 15th at the Old Distillery (North Mall, Cork city). The exhibition runs for two weeks and features the work of photographer Mike MacSweeney during the run of The Merchant of Venice, and a video installation curated by Pat Kiernan and Nicholas O’Riordan. Entry is free. Opening hours: 11am-4pm. All welcome.

Remembering The Merchant of Venice 2005, a roundtable discussion with the creative team, takes place on Saturday July 18th, 10.45am-4pm, in University College Cork, O’Rahilly Building, room G27. The event, which aims to reunite members of the creative team, cast, collaborators and audience from The Merchant of Venice, will be recorded and form the start of a new live archive about Corcadorca’s work. Guest panellists include Pat Kiernan (Director), Roma Patel (Set Designer), Mel Mercier (Composer), Eileen Walsh (Portia), Ryszard Radwanski (Tubal), Kieran Ahern (Antonio), Mary McCarthy (Director, The National Sculpture Factory) and Liz Meaney (Arts Director Performing and Local Arts, The Arts Council). We particularly want to hear what our audience has to say, so if you saw this spectacular production in 2005 and would be interested in attending the roundtable, please get in touch. Entry is free, but booking is essential. Please contact Anne and Fin at merchantofvenice2005@gmail.com to reserve your place.

For further info see: https://merchantofvenicecork2005.wordpress.com