Irish Renaissance Seminar – Marsh’s Library and UCD

“Early Modern Science and its Boundaries”

The 22nd meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar will be held in Marsh’s Library, St Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8, and hosted by UCD English on Saturday 12th October 2019.

Schedule

1.30pm Welcome

1.45pm Natural philosophy and human bodies

Dr Sue Hemmens (Marsh’s Library), ‘Some things worth a philosophical pen’: queries and desiderata relating to Ireland, 1650 to 1700

Dr Harriet Knight (independent scholar), Meaningful chaos: Francis Bacon and Robert Boyle’s Indigested Particulars

Mark Ronan (UCD), From Hal to Henry, ‘breaking through the foul and ugly mists’: Addiction and Maturing Out in the Henriad

3.15pm Break

3.45pm Plenary: Prof. Kevin Killeen (University of York), “The symphonic unknowability of the world: early modern poetics, science and the Book of Job”

4.45pm Response to the afternoon’s papers by Prof. Danielle Clarke (UCD)

We are very grateful for the support of the Society for Renaissance Studies, the World Universities Network and Marsh’s Library.

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Theatre: Staged reading of Shirley’s The Politician

A staged reading of James Shirley’s The Politician (1639), which tells a tale of court intrigue and ruthless deception, will be held at Smock Alley Dublin on Thursday 4th April 2019. The production will be directed by Kellie Hughes and performed by University College Dublin drama students.

The staged is organised by Prof Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex) who is also currently editing the play.

James Shirley (1596-1666)

James Shirley (1596-1666)

Arguing with Edmund Spenser in Contemporary Irish Poetry

Thursday 15th February, 7-9pm
Poetry Ireland, 11 Parnell Square East, Dublin 1.
Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised. Info from Poetry Ireland website.

The Tudor poet, Edmund Spenser, is not remembered fondly in Ireland, despite his having written most of his major works while living here as a planter and colonial administrator in the late sixteenth century, and despite the interest of W.B. Yeats in his potential uses as an Irish poet. The reasons for this disfavour are all too easy to identify: Spenser’s vicious polemic against both the native Irish and the descendants of the Norman settlers who had become ‘more Irish than the Irish themselves’ (as the saying goes) in his political dialogue, A View of the Present State of Ireland.

But Spenser has been an increasingly noticeable presence in contemporary Irish poetry, prompting exploration not just of the darker moments of Irish history during the plantations, and their implications for Ireland today, but also of the opportunities for reflection and even self-examination his poetry offers an Irish reader – and ultimately, perhaps, a re-evaluation of the usual narratives of the Irish literary tradition.

The School of English, Drama, Film and Creative Writing, University College Dublin and Poetry Ireland invite you to join five poets who have been thinking and arguing with Spenser in their recent work for an evening of discussion and readings: John McAuliffe (The Way In (2015)), Trevor Joyce (Fastness (2017)), Leanne O’Sullivan (A Quarter of an Hour (2018)), Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill (Ireland Professor of Poetry (2001-2004)), and current Ireland Professor of Poetry Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin (The Boys of Bluehill (2015)).

Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised here.

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Frontispiece to The Faerie Queene, printed 1590.

Public lecture: “Book History and the Digital Humanities”

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06 March 2017, 17:00
Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin

“Book History and the Digital Humanities”

A public lecture by Professor Alexander Wilkinson (University College Dublin) as part of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History Research Seminar Series 2016-17.

 

Talk: The Renaissance of Not Doing Things, Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray

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School of English, Drama and Film, UCD present

Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray (University of British Columbia, Canada)

“The Renaissance of Not Doing Things”

 

We typically describe the English Renaissance as a time of frantic activity, both in England and, increasingly, on a global scale. The other side of all this activity is a fascination with inactivity. Many writers of this period express a desire not to do anything.This desire often finds expression as the wish to become a plant or a work of art. I’m interested in how our sense of the Renaissance changes if we see Narcissus as the paradigmatic figure

Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray is Professor of English at the University of British Columbia. He specializes in Renaissance poetry and queer theory, and is the author of three monographs and numerous essays and journal articles.

 

This talk takes place at 4.30pm, Thursday 24th November in J208, Newman building, UCD

All Welcome!

‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’, Dr Farah Karim-Cooper, Friday 27 May, Abbey theatre

UCD / Abbey Shakespeare lecture on Friday 27th May, 4pm on the Abbey stage.

‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’

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This talk explores the question of how in the sixteenth and seventeenth century playhouses Shakespeare’s actors used gesture as a versatile performance technology and illustrates how Shakespearean drama allows for a rich, textured and various gestural vocabulary.

With Dr. Farah Karim-Cooper (Head of Higher Education and Research, Shakespeare’s Globe). Actor Marty Rea (playing the role of Iago in the Abbey Theatre’s current production of Othello) will be supporting this reading.

 

Report: “Shakespeare and Irish Radicalism” at the Pearse Museum

Report by Emily O’Brien

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The Pearse Museum provided atmospheric surroundings last night for the first of the UCD/Abbey Theatre Shakespeare lectures, in an evening that productively blended academic and theatrical approaches to the relationship between Shakespeare and Ireland in the context of this year of commemorations.

Professor Andy Murphy (St Andrews) began the evening with a lecture entitled “Shakespeare and Irish Radicalism: The Road to 1916”, which was both pioneering in content and elegant in form. Revealing to the audience the unexpectedly rich culture of Shakespeare in repeated Irish nationalist movements, as well as in those aligned with British imperialism, he demonstrated that Shakespeare in 1916 Ireland should be understood as a common cultural space where opposing political traditions could come together. This fascinating talk began and closed with contrasting lectures delivered on the same night in Dublin in 1917 by D. H. Madden and W. F. Trench, and took in Irish revolutionary journals, the collections of the Pearse family, and an intriguing volume of Shakespeare bearing a succession of revealing inscriptions.

It was a joy to have this erudite and scholarly lecture further illuminated by Owen Roe’s thrilling dramatic reading of several speeches from Shakespeare that had been discussed in Prof. Murphy’s lecture. These readings featured alongside his own insightful commentary on Ireland’s relationship to Shakespeare, from the perspective of an actor. As a perfect capstone to the evening, Roe ended by running a reading of an extract from Synge’s Playboy of the Western World into one from The Taming of the Shrew, dissolving any notion of a natural barrier.

Dr Jane Grogan (UCD), responsible for organizing this lecture series, is to be commended for her foresight in putting together such a richly rewarding and successful event. Check back for news and reports of the coming lectures.

Pearse and Shakespeare Exhibition at the Pearse Museum

Brian Crowley, curator of the Pearse Museum, was a gracious and enthusiastic host. The museum is currently displaying an exhibition on Pearse and Shakespeare. It runs until the end of August.

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[Image from Pearse Museum Facebook page]

This is part of the ‘Shakespeare Lives Across the Island’ programme, which can be downloaded here. More #Shakespeare400 and British Council #ShakespeareLives events can be found on the blog using the tag #ShaxIRL400. Follow us on Twitter at @ShakesinIreland.

Lecture: Prof. Gordon McMullan (King’s College, London), ‘Remembering and Forgetting Shakespeare in 1916’

Professor Gordon McMullan (King’s College, London) will be in Dublin on Thursday 12 May to give a lecture on ‘Remembering and Forgetting Shakespeare in 1916’ as part of the UCD/Abbey Theatre Lecture Series. It takes place at the Abbey Theatre (Peacock stage) and starts at 5pm. There are still a few tickets remaining so book yours now!

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This talk addresses what it means to remember Shakespeare in 2016, and reflects on the forgetting that is also required: forgetting not only aspects of Shakespeare’s life, work and legacy, but also that of certain of his contemporaries, notably those who died in the same year (Cervantes, Beaumont) or whose significant publication (the Jonson folio) has been overshadowed in subsequent centuries by Shakespeare’s cultural dominance.

 

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Further information about the UCD/Abbey Theatre Shakespeare Lectures:

UCD and the Abbey Theatre Shakespeare Lectures, begin on 11th May 2016. These annual talks bring together actors and academics to discuss how, why and where Shakespeare matters in Ireland, and in the “shared language” and cultural memory President Michael D. Higgins celebrated on his 2014 visit to Shakespeare’s Stratford-upon-Avon.

This year, the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, our venues include the National Library of Ireland, the Pearse Museum and the Abbey, with speakers from UCD, Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, King’s College, London, and the University of St Andrews, as well as the UCD Ad Astra Scholars and leading Irish actors.

Supported by the UCD College of Arts and Humanities Distinguished Speakers Series Funding


11th May, 7pm, Pearse Museum:Prof. Andrew Murphy (University of St Andrews), ‘Shakespeare and Irish Radicalism: The Road to 1916’

With Owen Roe (King Lear at the Abbey (2013))


12th May, 5pm, Abbey Theatre (Peacock):Prof. Gordon McMullan (King’s College, London), ‘Remembering and Forgetting Shakespeare in 1916’


27th May, 4pm, Abbey Theatre (Peacock): Dr Farah Karim-Cooper (Shakespeare’s Globe), ‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’

With Marty Rea (Richard II in DruidShakespeare 2015; Iago in Othello at the Abbey, 2016)


9th June, National Library, 7pm: Prof. Margaret Kelleher (UCD) and Prof. Danielle Clarke (UCD): ‘An “Irish Mode”? The Literary Writings and Legacy of Thomas MacDonagh.’ A conversation between Prof. Kelleher and Prof. Clarke of UCD School of English, Drama and Film

With the UCD Ad Astra Drama Scholars


All events are free. Tickets must be pre-booked at www.ucd.ie/alumni/events (for 11th May and 9th June events) or at the Abbey www.abbeytheatre.ie (for 12th and 27th May events).

 

This is part of the ‘Shakespeare Lives Across the Island’ programme, which can be downloaded here. More #Shakespeare400 and British Council #ShakespeareLives events can be found on the blog using the tag #ShaxIRL400. Follow us on Twitter at @ShakesinIreland.

Programme: Shakespeare Lives, 2016

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The full programme of events marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death is now available for download: Shakespeare Lives Across the Island – Conversations and Celebrations 2016.

This fantastic line-up, happening all across Ireland, is in partnership with the British Council, and involves universities, museums, libraries and theatres on both sides of the border.

Here’s a preview of just some of the upcoming events:

 

Irish Renaissance Seminar, QUB: Shakespeare Lives across the Island

on Saturday 7th May, 12pm- 7pm, in the Old Staff Common room, QUB

 

“Shakespeare: Here and Elsewhere” workshop, dlr Lexicon

a workshop on Shakespeare in film and modern popular culture at dlr Lexicon, Dun Laoighaire, 14th May 

 

Public talks: UCD – Abbey Theatre Shakespeare Lectures 2016

11th May, 7pm, Pearse Museum:  Prof. Andrew Murphy (University of St Andrews),‘Shakespeare and Irish Radicalism: The Road to 1916’

12th May, 5pm, Abbey Theatre (Peacock):  Prof. Gordon McMullan (King’s College, London), ‘Remembering and Forgetting Shakespeare in 1916’

27th May, 4pm, Abbey Theatre (Peacock): Dr Farah Karim-Cooper (Shakespeare’s Globe), ‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’

9th June, National Library, 7pm: Prof. Margaret Kelleher (UCD) and Prof. Danielle Clarke (UCD): ‘An “Irish Mode”? The Literary Writings and Legacy of Thomas MacDonagh. A conversation, with selected readings from MacDonagh’s works, performed by the UCD Ad Astra Drama Scholars

 

Symposium: Shakespeare 400 Ireland, NUIM, 21-22 Oct 2016

with a keynote lecture by Professor Willy Maley (University of Glasgow) ‘”They are rising, they are rising”: Shakespeare and 1916’, and papers by Professor Mark Burnett (Queens University Belfast), Dr Jane Grogan (UCD) and Professor Patrick Lonergan (NUI Galway)

 

More events can be found here.

 

Check back for more details soon, including an exhibition on Sir Kenneth Branagh at Queen’s University Belfast, a Shakespeare Day at Trinity College Dublin, and a performance of Pericles, Prince of Tyre in association with University College, Cork.

You can also follow what’s happening on Twitter @ShakesinIreland and using the hashtag #ShaxIRL400. Get in touch and let us know what you think!