Irish Renaissance Seminar – Marsh’s Library and UCD

“Early Modern Science and its Boundaries”

The 22nd meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar will be held in Marsh’s Library, St Patrick’s Close, Dublin 8, and hosted by UCD English on Saturday 12th October 2019.

Schedule

1.30pm Welcome

1.45pm Natural philosophy and human bodies

Dr Sue Hemmens (Marsh’s Library), ‘Some things worth a philosophical pen’: queries and desiderata relating to Ireland, 1650 to 1700

Dr Harriet Knight (independent scholar), Meaningful chaos: Francis Bacon and Robert Boyle’s Indigested Particulars

Mark Ronan (UCD), From Hal to Henry, ‘breaking through the foul and ugly mists’: Addiction and Maturing Out in the Henriad

3.15pm Break

3.45pm Plenary: Prof. Kevin Killeen (University of York), “The symphonic unknowability of the world: early modern poetics, science and the Book of Job”

4.45pm Response to the afternoon’s papers by Prof. Danielle Clarke (UCD)

We are very grateful for the support of the Society for Renaissance Studies, the World Universities Network and Marsh’s Library.

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Theatre: Staged reading of Shirley’s The Politician

A staged reading of James Shirley’s The Politician (1639), which tells a tale of court intrigue and ruthless deception, will be held at Smock Alley Dublin on Thursday 4th April 2019. The production will be directed by Kellie Hughes and performed by University College Dublin drama students.

The staged is organised by Prof Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex) who is also currently editing the play.

James Shirley (1596-1666)

James Shirley (1596-1666)

Arguing with Edmund Spenser in Contemporary Irish Poetry

Thursday 15th February, 7-9pm
Poetry Ireland, 11 Parnell Square East, Dublin 1.
Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised. Info from Poetry Ireland website.

The Tudor poet, Edmund Spenser, is not remembered fondly in Ireland, despite his having written most of his major works while living here as a planter and colonial administrator in the late sixteenth century, and despite the interest of W.B. Yeats in his potential uses as an Irish poet. The reasons for this disfavour are all too easy to identify: Spenser’s vicious polemic against both the native Irish and the descendants of the Norman settlers who had become ‘more Irish than the Irish themselves’ (as the saying goes) in his political dialogue, A View of the Present State of Ireland.

But Spenser has been an increasingly noticeable presence in contemporary Irish poetry, prompting exploration not just of the darker moments of Irish history during the plantations, and their implications for Ireland today, but also of the opportunities for reflection and even self-examination his poetry offers an Irish reader – and ultimately, perhaps, a re-evaluation of the usual narratives of the Irish literary tradition.

The School of English, Drama, Film and Creative Writing, University College Dublin and Poetry Ireland invite you to join five poets who have been thinking and arguing with Spenser in their recent work for an evening of discussion and readings: John McAuliffe (The Way In (2015)), Trevor Joyce (Fastness (2017)), Leanne O’Sullivan (A Quarter of an Hour (2018)), Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill (Ireland Professor of Poetry (2001-2004)), and current Ireland Professor of Poetry Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin (The Boys of Bluehill (2015)).

Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised here.

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Frontispiece to The Faerie Queene, printed 1590.

Public lecture: “Book History and the Digital Humanities”

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06 March 2017, 17:00
Trinity Long Room Hub, Trinity College Dublin

“Book History and the Digital Humanities”

A public lecture by Professor Alexander Wilkinson (University College Dublin) as part of the Trinity Centre for Early Modern History Research Seminar Series 2016-17.

 

Talk: The Renaissance of Not Doing Things, Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray

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School of English, Drama and Film, UCD present

Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray (University of British Columbia, Canada)

“The Renaissance of Not Doing Things”

 

We typically describe the English Renaissance as a time of frantic activity, both in England and, increasingly, on a global scale. The other side of all this activity is a fascination with inactivity. Many writers of this period express a desire not to do anything.This desire often finds expression as the wish to become a plant or a work of art. I’m interested in how our sense of the Renaissance changes if we see Narcissus as the paradigmatic figure

Prof. Stephen Guy-Bray is Professor of English at the University of British Columbia. He specializes in Renaissance poetry and queer theory, and is the author of three monographs and numerous essays and journal articles.

 

This talk takes place at 4.30pm, Thursday 24th November in J208, Newman building, UCD

All Welcome!

‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’, Dr Farah Karim-Cooper, Friday 27 May, Abbey theatre

UCD / Abbey Shakespeare lecture on Friday 27th May, 4pm on the Abbey stage.

‘Gesture on the Shakespearean Stage’

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This talk explores the question of how in the sixteenth and seventeenth century playhouses Shakespeare’s actors used gesture as a versatile performance technology and illustrates how Shakespearean drama allows for a rich, textured and various gestural vocabulary.

With Dr. Farah Karim-Cooper (Head of Higher Education and Research, Shakespeare’s Globe). Actor Marty Rea (playing the role of Iago in the Abbey Theatre’s current production of Othello) will be supporting this reading.