“Macbeth” at the Mill Theatre, Dundrum

Mill Productions present one of Shakespeare’s most intense tragedies. Directed by Geoffrey O’Keeffe and featuring a talented professional cast, this is a traditional production, with genuinely gripping and often affecting performances which sharpen our understanding of Shakespeare’s analysis of human folly and strive to do justice to this greatest of plays.

Evening Performances: Wednesday 10th and Wednesday 24th October at 7.30pm – Tickets €18/€16

Contact the Box Office directly to book your school or group in – info@milltheatre.ie / 01-2969340. Play running time: 2hrs 30mins with a short interval.

School Performance times weekdays at 10am and 1.30pm. A Study Guide will accompany the production. Schools/teachers please see the website for details here.

 

 

 

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Writing Lives 1500-1700 – conference, UCD 6-8th September 2018

#writinglivesUCD

Thursday 6th September 2018, Humanities Institute, UCD

9-9.30               Registration and coffee

9.30-11             Plenary I: Prof Andrew Hadfield (Sussex), Reading The Life Between the Lines: Nashe, Spenser and Others

11-11.30            Coffee

11.30-12.30                   Panel 1: The Religious Self

Richard Kirwan (UL) “Trouble Every Day: Experiences of Religious Exile in the Writings of Jacob Reihing”

John McCafferty (UCD)  ‘”O Felix Columba Caeli/ O Happy Dove of Heaven”: a manuscript life shredded by early modern print’

12.30-1.30         Lunch

1.30—2.30        Panel 2: Unmooring life-writing: method, memory, and genre

Chair: Prof Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle)

Ramona Wray (QUB), “Reading Life-Writing in the Cary/Tanfield Record”

Kate Hodgkin (U of East London), “Memory, melancholy and the languages of loss in 17th century life writing”

2.30-3               Break

3-4.15               Panel 3: – Life writing and religion

Ann-Maria Walsh (UCD) “Mary (née Boyle) Rich, Countess of Warwick (1624-1678): Writing and Experimenting – A Spiritual Life”

Mark Empey (NUIG) “Life writer and Life writing: the parallel worlds of Sir James Ware”

5pm                      Wine reception – Common Room, Newman Building, UCD

Friday 7th September 2018, K114, Newman Building, UCD

9.30-11             Plenary II: Prof Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle), Writing Children’s Lives

11-11.30            Coffee

11.30-1             Panel 4 – Women in the 17th Century

Carol Baxter (independent scholar) “’Serving God rather than my father’: religious life writing as a rejection of the patriarchal family”

Naomi McAreavey (UCD) – The Countess of Ormonde’s Letters (title tbc)

Danielle Clarke (UCD) “Irish women’s recipe books as life writing: form, process, method”

1-2pm                   Lunch (exhibition and archive visit)

2-3pm                   Panel 5 – Travel and formation of the self

Maria Luis Dominguez-Guerrero (Seville) “Rhetoric of the Conquest: Narrations from Castilian Explorers”

Eva Holmberg (Helsinki)  “Visual Self-Description in Seventeenth-Century British Travel Accounts”

4-6pm                   Walking tour of Renaissance Dublin (AM Walsh), followed by pub visit and conference dinner, at Le Pichet, Trinity Street, Dublin 2* [* Dinner is €40 per head. ]

Saturday 8th September 2018, K114, Newman Building

9.30-11             Plenary III: Prof Alan Stewart (Columbia), Writing Lives under Duress

11-11.15            Coffee

11.15-1 Panel 6 – Alternative Forms

Nelson Marques (Miami) “War and Self: Soldier’s Petitions in Seventeenth-Century Portugal”

Emma Claussen (Oxford)  “Forms of living in Descartes’s Les passions de l’âme

Raluca Duna (Bucharest) “Writing the self with images, painting identity with texts”

1-1.30pm              Roundtable and close

Followed by optional lunch in Donnybrook, Dublin 4.

The conference is free to attend, but for catering purposes the organisers would appreciate it if you could sign up using this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/writing-lives-1500-1700-tickets-48653964317

If you have any questions, please email the organisers at writinglives@ucd.ie.

This conference is supported by the College of Arts and Humanities and the Humanities Institute, UCD.

#writinglivesUCD

Image credit: ‘The Librarian’, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, c.1566 (Skokloster Castle)


 

Renaissance Re-enactment: The Visit of Archduke Ferdinand of Hapsburg to Kinsale in 1518

500 years ago Archduke Ferdinand of Habsburg arrived in Kinsale, Co. Cork, having been blown off course whilst sailing from Spain to the Low Countries. He and his party spent four days in June 1518 resting and resupplying in Ireland’s southernmost medieval town. The population provided a very hospitable welcome and even more so when they discovered that the Prince was on board. The chronicle of the voyage gives a colourful account of the royal party’s time in Ireland commenting on the dress, culture, and music of the people. Ferdinand succeeded his brother Charles V as Holy Roman Emperor in 1558.

At noon on Saturday 9th June we commemorate this event which connects us to the high politics of Europe. This will involve a short parade along the Pier Road from the Galleon Mast and a recreation of a meeting between the town councillors, townspeople, gallowglasses and the Archduke’s party as took place at the time, followed by complementary historical talks in the Temperance Hall during the afternoon.

Renaissance Re-enactment

Photo opportunities: 10:30am at St. Multose Church and 11am at Desmond Castle

12 noon: A pageant from the Galleon Mast, Pier Road to Market Quay to recreate encounters with townspeople, gallowglasses and poet.

2pm to 5pm: Talks at Temperance Hall (see poster and website below for details.)

For more on this event, see Kinsale.ie here.

For more on Ireland and 1518, see the website here.

Kinsale 1518 Archduke reenactment 2018

 

TV: King Lear on BBC2 – Monday 28th May

BBC2 will broadcast King Lear with an all-star cast on Monday 28th May 2018. Directed by Richard Eyre, Sir Anthony Hopkins stars as the titular monarch with Emma Thompson as Goneril, Emily Watson as Regan, and Florence Pugh as Cordelia.

Other key players include Jim Broadbent as Gloucester, Christopher Eccleston as Oswald, John Macmillan as the nefarious Edmund, and Irish actor Andrew Scott as Edgar. A co-production between Amazon and BBC, this film is set in an alternative 21st century Britain and is directed by Richard Eyre (The Hollow Crown).

For more, see the BBC website here.

Theatre: “Macbeth” by Icarus Theatre Collective – touring now

[From Icarus Theatre’s Macbeth press release]

The vicious, barbaric undercurrent in Shakespeare’s fear-filled tragedy erupts in Icarus Theatre’s kinetic and blood-thirsty production. Unrivalled on the battlefield, Macbeth is rewarded with rank and favour by a grateful king but the war has left its scars. With each enemy Macbeth butchers, his lust for power takes a more menacing grip. Spectres slaughtered on the battlefield drip poison in his ear, and passions erupt as he ferociously seizes the throne. But, violence breeds violence, and a reign born in blood quickly spirals out of control as Macbeth’s demons return to destroy him.

Set in the 11th century and culminating in an epic battle filled with revenge, justice, and beheadings, Icarus Theatre blends the traditional and the physical to bring to life some of literature’s most vibrant language and characters.

This production centres around the idea that Macbeth himself is suffering from PTSD. Director Max Lewendel comments:

“War is hell, and medieval warfare even more so. There is something in the psychology of PTSD that resonates here in a very Hitchcockian kind of way. This world is a supernatural nightmare for Macbeth and I wanted to explore the idea that the horrors of what he has done and seen lurk in every shadow, in every corner.”

In addition to this new psychological element, many of the traditional male roles are here cast as female characters, stressing the importance of gender parity on stage. This is a patriarchal world, but one that is being challenged by powerful women pushing forward change.

For more information and to book tickets, see the Icarus Theatre Collective website here.

Lawrence Stubbings (Macbeth), James Heatlie (Banquo)

Lawrence Stubbings as Macbeth and James Heatlie as Banquo  [Image credit: George Riddell and Icarus Theatre]

Arguing with Edmund Spenser in Contemporary Irish Poetry

Thursday 15th February, 7-9pm
Poetry Ireland, 11 Parnell Square East, Dublin 1.
Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised. Info from Poetry Ireland website.

The Tudor poet, Edmund Spenser, is not remembered fondly in Ireland, despite his having written most of his major works while living here as a planter and colonial administrator in the late sixteenth century, and despite the interest of W.B. Yeats in his potential uses as an Irish poet. The reasons for this disfavour are all too easy to identify: Spenser’s vicious polemic against both the native Irish and the descendants of the Norman settlers who had become ‘more Irish than the Irish themselves’ (as the saying goes) in his political dialogue, A View of the Present State of Ireland.

But Spenser has been an increasingly noticeable presence in contemporary Irish poetry, prompting exploration not just of the darker moments of Irish history during the plantations, and their implications for Ireland today, but also of the opportunities for reflection and even self-examination his poetry offers an Irish reader – and ultimately, perhaps, a re-evaluation of the usual narratives of the Irish literary tradition.

The School of English, Drama, Film and Creative Writing, University College Dublin and Poetry Ireland invite you to join five poets who have been thinking and arguing with Spenser in their recent work for an evening of discussion and readings: John McAuliffe (The Way In (2015)), Trevor Joyce (Fastness (2017)), Leanne O’Sullivan (A Quarter of an Hour (2018)), Nuala Ní Dhomhnaill (Ireland Professor of Poetry (2001-2004)), and current Ireland Professor of Poetry Eiléan Ní Chuilleanáin (The Boys of Bluehill (2015)).

Tickets: Free, but limited – booking advised here.

The_Faerie_Queene_frontispiece

Frontispiece to The Faerie Queene, printed 1590.

“The Winter’s Tale” at the Lir, Dublin

Performances at the Lir on Pearse Street, Dublin, from Friday 1st December until Thursday 7th December, at 7.30pm. Matinee: Monday 4th December, 1pm.
Tickets: €15 and €10 concession

The dark dramas of violent jealousy, sexual slander and death at the court of Sicilia, lead to a small baby girl being abandoned in the wild reaches of rural Bohemia. There, sixteen years later, the hot midsummer festivities are the background for delight, disguise and denunciation, which in turn carry the tale, replete with runaway lovers, a scalliwag, an old shepherd and his clown son back to Sicilia. The icy mourning of King Leontes begins to thaw as these two contrasting worlds meld, and in a magical finale full of revelations,  Shakespeare shows us his delight in such a vivid, motley collection of characters and his ultimate belief in forgiveness and redemption.

For more information on the production and to book tickets, see the Lir website here.