Talk: “Shakespeare and a Divided America” by Prof James Shapiro at the Galway International Arts Festival

[From the Galway International Arts Festival website.]

Professor James Shapiro, widely acknowledged as one of world’s leading and most entertaining Shakespeare scholars (author of 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare) will discuss the uses and misuses of Shakespeare to divide America, the subject of his next book. He will be interviewed by Professor Patrick Lonergan, Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies, NUI Galway.

DATE & TIME: 20 July 2019 5pm

VENUE: Aula Maxima, NUI Galway

TICKETS: €10 available from the Galway International Arts Festival website.


 

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Theatre: “Twelfth Night” in Roscommon

This July, the Pilgrim Players return to the Bishop’s Palace in Ballaghaderreen, Co Roscommon, with a new production of Twelfth Night.

The company aims to make accessible and vibrant theatre not just for ardent fans, but for all comers. Built in 1864, the Bishop’s Palace (aka Edmondstown House) is a historic home situated in beautiful grounds – the grounds will be open to the local community, and the audience are welcome to pack a picnic and enjoy this outdoor performance of one of Shakespeare’s best loved comedies.

VENUE:
The Bishop’s Palace, Edmondstown, Ballaghaderreen, Co. Roscommon, F45 NX04
DATES:
Friday 19 July 2019, 7pm (grounds open from 6pm)
Saturday 20 July 2019, 3pm (grounds open from 2pm)
Saturday 20 July 2019, 7pm (grounds open from 6pm)
Sunday 21 July 2019, 3pm (grounds open from 2pm)
Children are very welcome to attend. They will be admitted for free to the Saturday matinee performance. For more key info, see the the Pilgrim Players website.
Bishops Palace Ballaghaderreen Roscommon

The Bishop’s Palace, Edmondstown, Ballaghaderreen, Co. Roscommon


Irish Renaissance Seminar at Ulster University – May 18th

“SHAKESPEARE, ULSTER, BEYOND”

A meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar

Saturday 18th May 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast

For further information on this meeting of the IRS, please contact the organisers Kevin De Ornellas and Alisa Hemphill.

SCHEDULE

11.00-11.15: Welcome – in the Conor Lecture Theatre:

Kevin De Ornellas, Ulster University, co-organiser

Frank Ferguson, Ulster University, Research Director for English

Tom Maguire, Ulster University, Head of School of Arts and Humanities

11.15-12.05: Shakespeare in India:

Thea Buckley, Queen’s University, Belfast: “Indigenising Cleopatra as South India’s avenging goddess in Jayaraj’s Kannaki”.

Rosa Maria Garcia Periago, Queen’s University, Belfast: “Localising Romeo and Juliet in Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s Ram Leela”.

12.05-1pm: (Later) Early Modern European Histories:

Gabriel Guarino, Ulster University: “Sexuality and its Discontents: Marital Tensions and Sexual Defamation in the Court of Bourbon Naples, 1734-1799”.

Andrew Sneddon, Ulster University: “Representing Irish Witchcraft in ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’”.

1pm-1.40pm: Lunch

1.40-2.40pm: Legacies of the Past: Perspectives from around Ireland:

Emily Allen, National University of Ireland, Galway: “Lost Lands and Language: rhetoric of women’s petitions for land during Ireland’s Desmond and Baltinglass Rebellions”.

Nathan Dooner, University College Dublin: “Reactions to a gender-based vocabulary”.

Dónall MacCathmhaoill, Ulster University: “Save the Rose! Space and place in the campaign to preserve an Elizabethan theatre.”

2.40-3.20pm: Keynote Address:

Tom Maguire, Ulster University: “When Shakespeare’s not our contemporary: retelling, adaptation and contemporary children”.

3.20-3.30pm: Break.

3.30-4.20pm: Problems: Books, Brexit:

Marie-Louise Coolahan: National University of Ireland, Galway: “‘My lady’s books’: Devising a toolkit for quantitative research; or, What is a book and how do we count it?”

Stephen O’Neill, National University of Ireland, Maynooth: “Brexit Cliff Notes: Finding Refuge in Shakespeare’s King Lear”.

4.20-5.30pm: Adaptation, Animals, Performance: Four perspectives:

Amanda Finch, Ulster University of Ulster: “Cross-Gender Casting and Violence in Contemporary Performances of Shakespeare’s Comedies”.

Alisa Hemphill, Ulster University: “A common treasury for all: levelling  the animal-human divide through the Digger movement, 1649-1650”.

Kelly McCloy, Ulster University: “‘Alien’: Arnold Wesker and The  Merchant of Venice”. 

Alex Watson, Royal Holloway, University of London: “Protest in Contemporary Adaptations of Shakespeare’s Roman Plays”.

5.30-6.30pm: Conference close and reception


irs-logo          UU logo


 

Theatre: The Merry Wives of Windsor – Cork Shakespearean Company

[info from Cork Arts Theatre webpage]

Weds. 1st May – Sat. 4th May, produced by the Cork Shakespearean Company in the Cork Arts Theatre, directed by Raymond Brothers and Mike Keep and produced by Kieran O’Leary.

Celebrating their 95th Year, the Cork Shakespearean Company will perform the uplifting bawdy comedy The Merry Wives of Windsor. In the play, Shakespeare’s infamous knight-errant, Sir John Falstaff, has come to the township of Windsor in financial difficulties, and comes up with a plan to get himself some money – he will woo the wives of two local merchants, Page and Ford, seduce them both, and get the money he requires, in the hope that neither wives nor husbands find out the truth.

Unfortunately for Falstaff, the wives are much smarter than he suspects – they figure out that the letters sent to them telling of Falstaff’s affection are identically worded, and they decide to teach him a lesson, concocting a devious and hilarious plan to show Falstaff the error of his ways. Meanwhile, Mistress Page’s daughter, Anne, is the object of affection of several would be suitors, who all wish her hand, in spite of the fact that she is in love with a young courtier, Fenton, who seems to have the disapproval of all around him.

It will all lead to a fairy-lit crescendo as Falstaff learns a very valuable lesson – don’t mess with the Merry Wives of Windsor!

Tickets from the Cork Arts Theatre website here.


 

Conference at Trinity Dublin: Borderlines XXIII programme

We’ve finalised the programme for Borderlines Conference 2019, held at Trinity College, Dublin. Click the link for the Borderlines Programme to see the range of fantastic papers set to be presented. Looking forward to seeing you all at the end of the month! Borderlines Committee

via Borderlines XXIII Programme — Borderlines XXIII

Uncovering Irish Attitudes to Shakespeare — John J. Burns Library’s Blog

This week we feature a guest post by our current Burns Visiting Scholar in Irish Studies, Patrick Lonergan, Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway On 23 April 1916, the British academic Israel Gollancz published A Book of Homage to Shakespeare, a beautifully produced volume that gathered poems and […]

via Uncovering Irish Attitudes to Shakespeare — John J. Burns Library’s Blog

Shakespeare 19th c

Theatre: Staged reading of Shirley’s The Politician

A staged reading of James Shirley’s The Politician (1639), which tells a tale of court intrigue and ruthless deception, will be held at Smock Alley Dublin on Thursday 4th April 2019. The production will be directed by Kellie Hughes and performed by University College Dublin drama students.

The staged is organised by Prof Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex) who is also currently editing the play.

James Shirley (1596-1666)

James Shirley (1596-1666)