“The Winter’s Tale” at the Lir, Dublin

Performances at the Lir on Pearse Street, Dublin, from Friday 1st December until Thursday 7th December, at 7.30pm. Matinee: Monday 4th December, 1pm.
Tickets: €15 and €10 concession

The dark dramas of violent jealousy, sexual slander and death at the court of Sicilia, lead to a small baby girl being abandoned in the wild reaches of rural Bohemia. There, sixteen years later, the hot midsummer festivities are the background for delight, disguise and denunciation, which in turn carry the tale, replete with runaway lovers, a scalliwag, an old shepherd and his clown son back to Sicilia. The icy mourning of King Leontes begins to thaw as these two contrasting worlds meld, and in a magical finale full of revelations,  Shakespeare shows us his delight in such a vivid, motley collection of characters and his ultimate belief in forgiveness and redemption.

For more information on the production and to book tickets, see the Lir website here.

 

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CFP: Borderlines XXII: Sickness, Strife, and Suffering at Queen’s University Belfast 2018

Call for papers for Borderlines XXII: Sickness, Strife, and Suffering. This conference will be held from 13-15th April 2018 at Queen’s University Belfast.

Proposals for both papers and panels are welcomed from postgraduate and postdoctoral researchers in the fields of both Medieval and Early Modern studies.

Sickness, strife and suffering punctuate many medieval and early-modern narratives. When viewed by the modern eye, however, these experiences can be difficult to comprehend and empathise with, without resorting to anachronisms. Indeed, in her landmark treatise on pain, Elaine Scarry contests that ‘[p]hysical pain does not simply resist language but actively destroys it’ (Scarry, 1985: 4), thus rendering any description or explanation of pain practically impossible, regardless of era.

In the light of Scarry’s work, the specific difficulties posed by the expression and understanding of pain in the Middle Ages have been expounded upon and theorised by numerous scholars. Esther Cohen’s work on the various symbolisms of medieval pain (Cohen, 2010), in addition to Robert Mills’ adumbration of translative pain theories, mapping the medieval experience of pain onto that of the current day and vice versa (Mills, 2005), are just two examples of scholarship exploring this fascinating area of research connecting the human experience of the present with that of the past.

It is in this light that we are pleased to invite abstracts of ca. 250 words related to pain in the Middle Ages and early modern period. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Collective pain
  • Depictions of pain
  • Explanations of pain
  • Judicial literature
  • Medical literature
  • Memory and painNarratives of suffering
  • Pain and creativity
  • Pain and pleasure
  • Psychological pain
  • Social pain
  • Religious literature
  • Suffering in the afterlife

Please send all abstracts (along with a short academic biography) to borderlinesxxii@gmail.com by 5th February 2018.

Jonathan Swift Festival, 23–26 November 2017

Jonathan Swift Festival, 23–26 November

Dean Jonathan Swift

From TheLiberties.ie:

A fabulous weekend of cultural events beckons this November to celebrate the life and work of Ireland’s most popular author. Listen to ballads from 300 years ago, take walking tours around Swift’s Dublin, watch a theatrical performance or sit down to eat a dinner in the beautiful surrounds of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral. Immerse yourself in Swift’s life and work, and hear from contemporary writers, musicians, historians and performers taking up Swift’s challenge to “Go, traveller, and imitate if you can this earnest and dedicated champion of liberty.”

The famous author and Dean of St Patrick’s Cathedral was born 350 years ago this year. Best known for his satirical works, including Gulliver’s Travels, Swift was also a noted champion of liberty and freedom of thought and advanced a number of social causes. His legacy to the city is profound, both in a celebrated body of work and in a number of institutions which he founded and endowed, including St Patrick’s Hospital on Bow Lane.

Check out details of the Festival at www.jonathanswiftfestival.ie.

HIGHLIGHTS

23rd November: Festival launch at 6:30pm in St Patrick’s Cathedral

23rd November: Jonathan Swift: Place and Space – a special exhibition of rare books, artefacts and pamphlets connected to Swift in Dublin Castle (admission charge)

24th November: Ballads of Swift’s Dublin: singer Padraig O Nuallain performs songs from the streets of Dublin in Swift’s time – starts 7pm at Christ Church Cathedral (admission €10)

25th November: Swift Symposium – an international gathering to mark the 350th anniversary of Swift’s birth – the Deanery, St Patrick’s Close

26th November: Swift’s Food – a sumptuous and unique dining experience in the nave of St Patrick’s Cathedral featuring food of the later 17th century – starts 7:30pm.

30th November: Swift’s Vision – a night of poetry, music and song to celebrate the life of a unique voice in world literature – starts 8pm at St Patrick’s Cathedral (admission €15)

Gaiety School of Acting Shakespeare Schools Programme: King Lear (Cork and Dublin)

The Gaiety School of Acting Shakespeare Schools Programme presents King Lear. A run at Dean Crowe theatre in Athlone has already been completed, with dates remaining in Cork and Dublin cities at Firkin Crane and Smock Alley theatres respectively.

King Lear

The Gaiety School of Acting – The National Theatre School of Ireland is offering Leaving Cert. students a unique opportunity.

The Gaiety School of Acting is delighted to launch our 2017 production of King Lear. This production will travel to Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin, Firkin Crane, Cork and The Dean Crowe Theatre, Athlone from the 23rd of October to the 1st December.

This is the 5th year of our Shakespeare Schools programme and in 2016 we performed Hamlet for almost 6500 students from 130 schools. This means that almost 1 in every 9 students sitting their leaving Certificate English exams in June will have seen our production. We are excited to once again provide students with the opportunity to see Shakespeare’s work live.

Student tickets are €17 with all teachers tickets complimentary. Included in the ticket price is the following:

  • Traditional Production of King Lear (1.5 Hours).
  • Workshop (1 Hour) with a chance to engage with some of the cast about questions on the Leaving Cert, including relationships, characters and themes
  • Student Workbook with information on General Vision and Viewpoint, Social Settings, Characters and Theatrical information.
  • Pre show video for your students which will introduce them to the play, its literary genre and the cultural context.

Dates

Dean CroweAthlone24th-27th October 2017

Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin6th-10th November 2017

Firkin Crane, Cork City13th-17th November 2017

Smock Alley Theatre, Dublin: 27th November – 1st December 2017

Tickets: € 17 (Teachers complimentary)

Booking info: shakespeare@gaietyschool.com

For programme queries or to speak directly to the Programme Coordinator contact The Gaiety School of Acting on 01 6799277