CFP – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception – conference at Trinity College Dublin 2020

Trinity College Dublin 24-25 April 2020 Proposals for papers are invited for a conference on The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Keynote Speaker: Professor […]

via Appel à contribution – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception — RMBLF.be

Irish Renaissance Seminar at Ulster University – May 18th

“SHAKESPEARE, ULSTER, BEYOND”

A meeting of the Irish Renaissance Seminar

Saturday 18th May 2019 at Ulster University, Belfast

For further information on this meeting of the IRS, please contact the organisers Kevin De Ornellas and Alisa Hemphill.

SCHEDULE

11.00-11.15: Welcome – in the Conor Lecture Theatre:

Kevin De Ornellas, Ulster University, co-organiser

Frank Ferguson, Ulster University, Research Director for English

Tom Maguire, Ulster University, Head of School of Arts and Humanities

11.15-12.05: Shakespeare in India:

Thea Buckley, Queen’s University, Belfast: “Indigenising Cleopatra as South India’s avenging goddess in Jayaraj’s Kannaki”.

Rosa Maria Garcia Periago, Queen’s University, Belfast: “Localising Romeo and Juliet in Sanjay Leela Bhansali’s Ram Leela”.

12.05-1pm: (Later) Early Modern European Histories:

Gabriel Guarino, Ulster University: “Sexuality and its Discontents: Marital Tensions and Sexual Defamation in the Court of Bourbon Naples, 1734-1799”.

Andrew Sneddon, Ulster University: “Representing Irish Witchcraft in ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’”.

1pm-1.40pm: Lunch

1.40-2.40pm: Legacies of the Past: Perspectives from around Ireland:

Emily Allen, National University of Ireland, Galway: “Lost Lands and Language: rhetoric of women’s petitions for land during Ireland’s Desmond and Baltinglass Rebellions”.

Nathan Dooner, University College Dublin: “Reactions to a gender-based vocabulary”.

Dónall MacCathmhaoill, Ulster University: “Save the Rose! Space and place in the campaign to preserve an Elizabethan theatre.”

2.40-3.20pm: Keynote Address:

Tom Maguire, Ulster University: “When Shakespeare’s not our contemporary: retelling, adaptation and contemporary children”.

3.20-3.30pm: Break.

3.30-4.20pm: Problems: Books, Brexit:

Marie-Louise Coolahan: National University of Ireland, Galway: “‘My lady’s books’: Devising a toolkit for quantitative research; or, What is a book and how do we count it?”

Stephen O’Neill, National University of Ireland, Maynooth: “Brexit Cliff Notes: Finding Refuge in Shakespeare’s King Lear”.

4.20-5.30pm: Adaptation, Animals, Performance: Four perspectives:

Amanda Finch, Ulster University of Ulster: “Cross-Gender Casting and Violence in Contemporary Performances of Shakespeare’s Comedies”.

Alisa Hemphill, Ulster University: “A common treasury for all: levelling  the animal-human divide through the Digger movement, 1649-1650”.

Kelly McCloy, Ulster University: “‘Alien’: Arnold Wesker and The  Merchant of Venice”. 

Alex Watson, Royal Holloway, University of London: “Protest in Contemporary Adaptations of Shakespeare’s Roman Plays”.

5.30-6.30pm: Conference close and reception


irs-logo          UU logo


 

Conference at Trinity Dublin: Borderlines XXIII programme

We’ve finalised the programme for Borderlines Conference 2019, held at Trinity College, Dublin. Click the link for the Borderlines Programme to see the range of fantastic papers set to be presented. Looking forward to seeing you all at the end of the month! Borderlines Committee

via Borderlines XXIII Programme — Borderlines XXIII

Women and Indian Shakespeares – conference CFP

CALL FOR PAPERS

Women and Indian Shakespeares:
Exploring cinema, translation, performance

30 October – 1 November 2019
Queen’s University, Belfast

 

Indian Shakespeares is an established field of study, but no international conference has yet centralised the issue of the female in Indian Shakespeares. Recent feminist works include the retelling of King Lear in Sangeeta Datta’s film Life Goes On (2010) or in Preti Taneja’s novel We That Are Young (2017), Romeo and Juliet in Arshinagar (dir. Aparna Sen) or Bornila Chatterjee’s 2016 film adaptation of Titus Andronicus, The Hungry. Indeed, it has been argued that the women in Vishal Bhardwaj’s celebrated hero-centric film trilogy possess transformative agency. Such works have continued to reshape the debate surrounding the role of women.

This conference thus emerges in the context of these retellings and recent historical events in India and worldwide. It aims to explore uncharted territory, bringing together researchers and practitioners to establish the state of current scholarship in this vibrant, under-examined field. We invite proposals for 20-minute papers, panels, workshops and creative approaches on any aspect of Women and Indian Shakespeares. Alternative presentations are also equally welcome, such as film shorts, film scripts, etc.

Contributions are invited on any of the following aspects of the topic:
* Depictions of women in Indian Shakespeares on screen or on stage
* Indian female practitioners of Shakespeare
* Female Indian diasporic practitioners of Shakespeare
* Examinations of cross-dressed women
* Examinations of cross-gendered casting
* Transgender women in Indian Shakespeares
* LGBTQ Indian Shakespeares
* Feminist theory and intersectionality in relation to Indian Shakespeares
* Issues of caste in relation to women and Indian Shakespeares
* Regional perspectives and representations of women
* Challenges of researching Women and Indian Shakespeares

200-300 word abstracts for works to be presented at the conference should be sent by 1st April 2019. Together with the abstract, participants are invited to send a brief (up to 100 words) bio stating their affiliation, research interests and relevant academic output. Decisions will be made by 1 June 2019. Both abstracts and bios should be sent in Word or PDF format to: indianshakespeares@gmail.com If accepted, abstracts will be circulated among conference participants in advance of the event. Auditors are also welcome to attend, but priority will be given to those presenting.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Prof. Paromita Chakravarti (Jadavpur University)
  • Ms. Bornila Chatterjee (filmmaker, The Hungry )
  • Ms. Sangeeta Datta (filmmaker, Life Goes On )
  • Dr. Sreedevi Nair (NSS College for Women)
  • Prof. Jyotsna Singh (Michigan State University)
  • Dr. Poonam Trivedi (formerly Delhi University)

Organising Committee (Queen’s University, Belfast):
Dr. Thea Buckley, Leverhulme Early Career Research Fellow (co-chair)
Dr. Rosa García Periago, Marie Curie Research Fellow (co-chair)
Prof. Mark Thornton Burnett (consultant)

Leverhulme_Trust logo QUB logo Marie Curie_logo_


 

Writing Lives 1500-1700 – conference, UCD 6-8th September 2018

#writinglivesUCD

Thursday 6th September 2018, Humanities Institute, UCD

9-9.30               Registration and coffee

9.30-11             Plenary I: Prof Andrew Hadfield (Sussex), Reading The Life Between the Lines: Nashe, Spenser and Others

11-11.30            Coffee

11.30-12.30                   Panel 1: The Religious Self

Richard Kirwan (UL) “Trouble Every Day: Experiences of Religious Exile in the Writings of Jacob Reihing”

John McCafferty (UCD)  ‘”O Felix Columba Caeli/ O Happy Dove of Heaven”: a manuscript life shredded by early modern print’

12.30-1.30         Lunch

1.30—2.30        Panel 2: Unmooring life-writing: method, memory, and genre

Chair: Prof Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle)

Ramona Wray (QUB), “Reading Life-Writing in the Cary/Tanfield Record”

Kate Hodgkin (U of East London), “Memory, melancholy and the languages of loss in 17th century life writing”

2.30-3               Break

3-4.15               Panel 3: – Life writing and religion

Ann-Maria Walsh (UCD) “Mary (née Boyle) Rich, Countess of Warwick (1624-1678): Writing and Experimenting – A Spiritual Life”

Mark Empey (NUIG) “Life writer and Life writing: the parallel worlds of Sir James Ware”

5pm                      Wine reception – Common Room, Newman Building, UCD

Friday 7th September 2018, K114, Newman Building, UCD

9.30-11             Plenary II: Prof Kate Chedgzoy (Newcastle), Writing Children’s Lives

11-11.30            Coffee

11.30-1             Panel 4 – Women in the 17th Century

Carol Baxter (independent scholar) “’Serving God rather than my father’: religious life writing as a rejection of the patriarchal family”

Naomi McAreavey (UCD) – The Countess of Ormonde’s Letters (title tbc)

Danielle Clarke (UCD) “Irish women’s recipe books as life writing: form, process, method”

1-2pm                   Lunch (exhibition and archive visit)

2-3pm                   Panel 5 – Travel and formation of the self

Maria Luis Dominguez-Guerrero (Seville) “Rhetoric of the Conquest: Narrations from Castilian Explorers”

Eva Holmberg (Helsinki)  “Visual Self-Description in Seventeenth-Century British Travel Accounts”

4-6pm                   Walking tour of Renaissance Dublin (AM Walsh), followed by pub visit and conference dinner, at Le Pichet, Trinity Street, Dublin 2* [* Dinner is €40 per head. ]

Saturday 8th September 2018, K114, Newman Building

9.30-11             Plenary III: Prof Alan Stewart (Columbia), Writing Lives under Duress

11-11.15            Coffee

11.15-1 Panel 6 – Alternative Forms

Nelson Marques (Miami) “War and Self: Soldier’s Petitions in Seventeenth-Century Portugal”

Emma Claussen (Oxford)  “Forms of living in Descartes’s Les passions de l’âme

Raluca Duna (Bucharest) “Writing the self with images, painting identity with texts”

1-1.30pm              Roundtable and close

Followed by optional lunch in Donnybrook, Dublin 4.

The conference is free to attend, but for catering purposes the organisers would appreciate it if you could sign up using this link: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/writing-lives-1500-1700-tickets-48653964317

If you have any questions, please email the organisers at writinglives@ucd.ie.

This conference is supported by the College of Arts and Humanities and the Humanities Institute, UCD.

#writinglivesUCD

Image credit: ‘The Librarian’, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, c.1566 (Skokloster Castle)


 

British Shakespeare Association Conference at Queen’s University Belfast, 14-17th June

[Quoted from BSA website.]

2018 BSA Conference – 14-17th June 2018 at Queen’s University Belfast

Following on from the 2016 celebrations, the 2018 BSA conference offers an opportunity for academics, practitioners enthusiasts and teachers (primary, secondary and sixth- form teachers and college lecturers) to reflect upon Shakespeare Studies today.

What does Shakespeare Studies mean in the here-and-now? What are the current and anticipated directions in such diverse fields of enquiry as Shakespeare and pedagogy, Shakespeare and race, Shakespeare and the body, Shakespeare and childhood, Shakespeare and religion, Shakespeare and economics, Shakespeare and the law, Shakespeare and emotion, Shakespeare and politics, Shakespeare and war and Shakespeare and the environment? What is Shakespeare’s place inside the curriculum and inside debates around theory, queer studies and feminism? Where are we in terms of editing and materiality, and where does Shakespeare sit alongside his contemporaries, male and female? How does theatre practice, performance history, adaptation, cinema and citation figure in ever evolving Shakespeare Studies?

In particular, this conference is keen to explore the challenges facing Shakespeare Studies today and to reflect on newer emergent approaches. 

Plenary Speakers include: Prof. Pascale Aebischer (University of Exeter), Prof. Clara Calvo (University of Murcia), Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Courtney Lehmann (University of the Pacific), and Prof. Ayanna Thompson (George Washington University).

UK Premieres include: Veeram (dir. Jayaraj, 2016), a South Indian film adaptation of Macbeth, and Hermia and Helena (dir. Matías Piñeiro, 2016), an Argentine adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

BSA 2018 also includes: Q+As with theatre director Andrea Montgomery (The Belfast Tempest, 2016) and film directors Jayaraj and Matías Piñeiro.

For more information contact BSA2018@qub.ac.uk

For details on the programme,etc. and to register, see QUB website here.

[Quoted from BSA website.]

[Image from The Belfast Tempest (dir. Andrea Montgomery, 2016), Terra Nova Productions. Courtesy of Neil Harrison (models Sean Brown and Louise Parker).]


 

Conference CfP: Writing Lives in Europe, 1500-1700

University College Dublin, 6th-8th September 2018

This conference on life writing/self writing will address questions related to life writing across Europe between 1500-1700, in particular the influence of different religious, social, cultural and national perspectives on the emergence of various forms of self-writing. We are particularly interested in relationships, connections, textual traffic and circulation across Europe through networks such as intellectual circles/coteries, religious orders, and the experience of exiled communities. Life writing has long historical roots, but such writings are arguably the first examples of demotic, vernacular writing in the period. ‘Life writing’ describes narratives that allow us to interrogate how far ideas of self were fashioned by and through various forms of written representation, and to examine the stylistic, generic and social parameters to the formation of identities. Life writings comprise new, hybrid and emerging forms over the period 1500-1700, developing from relatively ‘static’ modes such as saints lives, eulogies, encomia, into more dynamic forms like biography, autobiography, chronicle histories, prison writing, prophecy, sermons, diaries, elegies, monumental verse, and letters. The conference aims to provide a more nuanced account of the emergence, creation and reception of narratives of the self, focussing not just on content, but on narrative, generic and material frameworks that inflect the representation of the “self” according to variables such as gender, class, region, language and religion.

The key questions that we hope that contributors will address include:
1. How do we define “life writing” and what kinds of narratives, texts and artifacts might it include?
2. What are the critical differences between biographically based criticism and the investigation of self writing/narrativization of selves?
3. What are the specific conditions (historical, cultural, local, religious/confessional, familial) that enable the emergence of life writing over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Why then?
4. How useful is standard periodisation for thinking about the emergence of these hybrid, complex forms from (mostly) domestic spaces?
5. How significant is it that women writers and subjects are so strongly represented in life writing, and what is at stake in these representations?
6. How might texts which are generically distinct from life writing be read through this framework, e.g. poems, romances, polemic etc?
7. What role does editing, transmission and circulation play in the construction and reception of life writing?
8. What light might comparative perspectives from other languages and cultures offer?

We welcome contributions from established and early career researchers, and encourage papers that address non-Anglophone writings, although papers will be delivered in English.

Papers (20 minutes) on the following topics are particularly welcome:
– memorialization
– exemplarity
– forms/modes/genres/language choices
– materiality/transmission
– privacy/publication
– historical contextualisation(s)
– authorship/collaboration
– community
– spirituality/religion/proselytising

Proposals (comprising a title, 200 word abstract, up to 5 keywords, and a 100 word bio) should be sent to: lifewriting@ucd.ie by Friday March 16th 2018.

Organisers: Prof. Danielle Clarke (School Of English, Drama & Film, UCD) and Prof. John McCafferty (School of History, UCD).

[Image credit: Print by Andrea Meldolla – mid-sixteenth century (Trustees British Museum)]