Conference CfP: Writing Lives in Europe, 1500-1700

University College Dublin, 6th-8th September 2018

This conference on life writing/self writing will address questions related to life writing across Europe between 1500-1700, in particular the influence of different religious, social, cultural and national perspectives on the emergence of various forms of self-writing. We are particularly interested in relationships, connections, textual traffic and circulation across Europe through networks such as intellectual circles/coteries, religious orders, and the experience of exiled communities. Life writing has long historical roots, but such writings are arguably the first examples of demotic, vernacular writing in the period. ‘Life writing’ describes narratives that allow us to interrogate how far ideas of self were fashioned by and through various forms of written representation, and to examine the stylistic, generic and social parameters to the formation of identities. Life writings comprise new, hybrid and emerging forms over the period 1500-1700, developing from relatively ‘static’ modes such as saints lives, eulogies, encomia, into more dynamic forms like biography, autobiography, chronicle histories, prison writing, prophecy, sermons, diaries, elegies, monumental verse, and letters. The conference aims to provide a more nuanced account of the emergence, creation and reception of narratives of the self, focussing not just on content, but on narrative, generic and material frameworks that inflect the representation of the “self” according to variables such as gender, class, region, language and religion.

The key questions that we hope that contributors will address include:
1. How do we define “life writing” and what kinds of narratives, texts and artifacts might it include?
2. What are the critical differences between biographically based criticism and the investigation of self writing/narrativization of selves?
3. What are the specific conditions (historical, cultural, local, religious/confessional, familial) that enable the emergence of life writing over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Why then?
4. How useful is standard periodisation for thinking about the emergence of these hybrid, complex forms from (mostly) domestic spaces?
5. How significant is it that women writers and subjects are so strongly represented in life writing, and what is at stake in these representations?
6. How might texts which are generically distinct from life writing be read through this framework, e.g. poems, romances, polemic etc?
7. What role does editing, transmission and circulation play in the construction and reception of life writing?
8. What light might comparative perspectives from other languages and cultures offer?

We welcome contributions from established and early career researchers, and encourage papers that address non-Anglophone writings, although papers will be delivered in English.

Papers (20 minutes) on the following topics are particularly welcome:
– memorialization
– exemplarity
– forms/modes/genres/language choices
– materiality/transmission
– privacy/publication
– historical contextualisation(s)
– authorship/collaboration
– community
– spirituality/religion/proselytising

Proposals (comprising a title, 200 word abstract, up to 5 keywords, and a 100 word bio) should be sent to: lifewriting@ucd.ie by Friday March 16th 2018.

Organisers: Prof. Danielle Clarke (School Of English, Drama & Film, UCD) and Prof. John McCafferty (School of History, UCD).

[Image credit: Print by Andrea Meldolla – mid-sixteenth century (Trustees British Museum)]

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Symposium: New directions in early modern Irish women’s history

This one-day interdisciplinary symposium, presented by the Women’s History Association of Ireland, will be held at the Moore Institute in NUI Galway on Friday 16th February 2018.

This will bring together leading and emerging scholars from a variety of disciplines currently engaged in cutting-edge research on the history of early modern Irish women. Keynote lectures will be delivered by Professor Mary O’Dowd (QUB) and Professor Jane Ohlmeyer (TCD). Other confirmed speakers include Sparky Booker (QUB), Felicity Maxwell (NUIG), Frances Nolan (UCD), Clodagh Tait (MI), Evan Bourke (NUIG) and Jane Maxwell (TCD). The symposium is free to attend, but advance registration is necessary.

For further details, contact the organiser Dr Bronagh McShane at: bronagh.mcshane@nuigalway.ie

For more on the Women’s History Association of Ireland, see the WHAI blog here.

 

Call for Papers: Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference, Maynooth University

Thursday, 5 July 2018, 09:00 – Sunday, 8 July 2018, 22:00
Department of Music, Logic House, Maynooth University

Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference: Call for papers (deadline for proposals 4 December 2017)

The Music Department at Maynooth University is pleased to host the 2018 Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference. The Conference will take place from 5th to 8th July 2018, it is envisaged that  we will be able to include c.170 papers.

We welcome papers and themed session on any relevant topic, from performing and recording early music in the twenty-first century, to madrigal studies, sources studies, analytical studies, medieval and renaissance music in Ireland, to mention only a few. In view of recent political events and across the world, however, as a committee, we would like to suggest at least one topic and create space to consider the politics around researching, teaching and performing Med & Ren music in a time when racists, white nationalists (not only in the US) and xenophobes feel emboldened. How do we teach Med & Ren music courses that do not appear to be safe havens for white supremacists? That challenge ahistorical views of Med & Ren as all white (male) and Christian? What resources do we need? What stories are we not telling? What does intersectional, postcolonial, and/or anti-racist research, teaching and music-making look like or sound like in our field? What are the structural barriers to inclusivity and diversity in our field, and what can we do to remove them? We feel this is an important topic for our research fields, but it is not intended as a conference theme in any restrictive way and we would like to stress of course, that all themes and topics will be considered with equal interest.

Possible formats of presentation include, but are not limited to:

  • individual papers of 20 minutes
  • paired papers (60 minutes including QA)
  • themed sessions (120 minutes for 4 papers and 90 minutes for 3 papers, including QA)
  • round tables
  • workshops/ lecture-recitals
  • posters
  • short 10-minute presentations

Conference languages: German, English, French, Italian, Spanish

All proposals should include:

  • title
  • indication of format
  • proposer’s name
  • proposer’s affiliation (if any)
  • names and affiliations of any additional participants
  • contact email
  • AV requirements
  • a short bio or bios of the participants (max. 15 lines; this has no bearing on the evaluation but simply for distribution to chairs)

Abstract:

  • for individual contributions : c. 250 words
  • for sessions with multiple participants: c. 200 words on the proposal as a whole, and c. 100 words on the contribution of each participant

Deadline for all proposals: 4 December 2017.

Notification of acceptance: by 31 January 2018.

Proposals to be submitted to MedRen2018@mu.ie

General Information

The committee would like to support academic parenting. As such, a room with a fridge will be available as lactation room. The room is located on the first floor of Logic House (accessible via staircases),  the same building where the main sessions will take place.

Committee

Antonio Cascelli (Maynooth University, Ireland)
Eleanor Giraud (University of Limerick, Ireland)
Frank Lawrence (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Melanie Marshall (University College Cork, Ireland)
Thomas Schmidt (University of Manchester/ University of Huddersfield)

For information contact: MedRen2018@mu.ie

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Collaborative Research in Early Modern Studies, a symposium hosted by the Limerick Early Modern Studies Forum, 25th September 2015

The Limerick Early Modern Studies Forum held its first ever public event on the 25th September 2015 with a symposium on ‘Collaborative Research in Early Modern Studies’. The Limerick Early Modern Studies Forum is a body established to support the research activities of early modernists across the disciplines at the University of Limerick and Mary Immaculate College, Limerick. The Forum was founded in February 2015, following the award of funding from the Irish Research Council New Foundations Scheme. This funding will facilitate the various start-up activities of the research cluster which include the recent symposium and a two-day conference on the theme of ‘Moments of Becoming: Transitions and Transformations in Early Modern Europe’ which will take on 20-21 November 2015 at the University of Limerick (the conference programme and registration forms are available here: https://emslimerick.wordpress.com).

Limerick Early Modern Studies Forum 2The recent symposium explored different aspects of research collaboration in early modern studies. In a paper on ‘Research Collaboration and Early Modern Studies’, Prof. Graeme Murdock (TCD) discussed his experiences of establishing early modern research centres at the universities of Birmingham and Trinity College Dublin. In a paper entitled ‘In the Tavern, at the University, and Online: Collaborating on the Early Modern in Ireland’, Dr. Edel Semple (UCC) discussed the value and importance of informal, inter-institutional, and online fora as a means of stimulating and supporting research collaboration with particular reference to her experiences of the Early Modern Tavern Society, the Irish Renaissance Seminar, and the Shakespeare in Ireland blog. In his presentation on ‘Herding Cats and Cataloging Early-Modern Spanish Print. Some Reflections on managing Iberian Books’, Dr. Sandy Wilkinson (UCD) discussed his experiences as the Principal Investigator of the long-running Iberian Books project which is funded by the Mellon Foundation. The concluding ‘round-table’ discussion provided an opportunity to explore how the many insights offered over the course of the symposium might inform the future development of the Limerick Early Modern Studies Forum.

Reported by Dr. Richard Kirwan, Dept. History, University of Limerick

For further information on the Limerick Early Modern Studies Forum, please see the EMSL webpage.

Symposium: Early Modern Military Identity – University College Cork

Early Modern Military Identity

August 28th 2015, 2pm-6pm

University College Cork, O’Rahilly Building, room G27

2-2.15pm Welcome

2.15-3.45pm PANEL 1:
Andrew Hadfield, ‘Dulce Bellum Inexpertis: The defence of Lord Grey’
David Edwards, ‘Campaign Journals of the Elizabethan Irish Wars’
Matthew Woodcock, ‘”I speak to thee plain soldier”: Constructing and Defending Identity in Tudor Military Autobiography’

3.45-4.20 LUNCH

4.30-6pm PANEL 2:
Clodagh Tait, ‘“A print on my body of this day’s service”: Experiences of ‘wounds and hurts’ in early modern Irish warfare’
Cian O’ Mahony, ‘Souldiers, or Clarkes, or Both’: Literary and Military Identity in Pre-Civil War Norfolk’
James O’ Neill, ‘Scythians, cannibals and werewolves? The Nine Years War and the myth of the Irish primitive’

7.30-8.30pm PUBLIC LECTURE:
Prof. Andrew Hadfield – ‘Edmund Spenser on the Munster Plantation’
This event takes place at the Elizabeth Fort (Barrack Street, Cork city)

For further information, please contact Dr Cian O’Mahony (School of English, UCC) at cian.omahony@ucc.ie

Symposium and Public Lecture: “Early Modern Military Identity” at University College Cork, 28th August 2015

“Early Modern Military Identity” Symposium and Public Lecture – University College Cork, 28th August 2015.

Symposium: This one-day symposium will provide an interdisciplinary platform focusing on the construction of early modern military identity: how were such identities formed, written about in both print and manuscript, manipulated and subsequently interpreted during the early modern period (c.1550-1700)? Speakers will engage with this theme from a variety of Irish, Anglo-Irish, English and wider international perspectives. Research areas under consideration in relation to the construction of military identity include, but are not limited to: creative expression (Prose and Poetry); historical documentation (Journals, Diaries, Correspondence, State Records and Wills); new, evolving or translated media (Newspapers, Instruction Manuals, Pamphlets and related ephemera).

A key objective of the symposium is to interrogate the formation, or perhaps fabrication, of soldierly personas by early modern authors, particularly through the relation of real or assumed military experience, and to examine what effect these types of writing had on wider contemporary literary production and our subsequent understanding of the period.

The symposium consists of two panels, beginning after lunch to facilitate travel arrangements (2pm-6pm). Confirmed participants include: Dr. David Edwards (UCC), Dr. Matthew Woodcock (UEA) and Prof. Andrew Hadfield (Sussex). For interested parties, the full programme, together with accommodation and travel recommendations will be available shortly. Please register your interest with Dr. Cian O’ Mahony (cian.omahony@ucc.ie), or email with any queries. Venue: O’Rahilly Building, UCC. This event is generously supported by UCC’s School of English and the School of History.

Public lecture: In conjunction with the Cork City Heritage Fund, the symposium will be followed that evening by a public lecture, given by Prof. Andrew Hadfield in the grounds of the recently refurbished Elizabeth Fort, near UCC and Cork city centre, which will focus on Edmund Spenser’s Cork (Elizabeth Fort, Barrack Street, 7.30pm on Friday 28th August). All welcome.