Conference CfP: Writing Lives in Europe, 1500-1700

University College Dublin, 6th-8th September 2018

This conference on life writing/self writing will address questions related to life writing across Europe between 1500-1700, in particular the influence of different religious, social, cultural and national perspectives on the emergence of various forms of self-writing. We are particularly interested in relationships, connections, textual traffic and circulation across Europe through networks such as intellectual circles/coteries, religious orders, and the experience of exiled communities. Life writing has long historical roots, but such writings are arguably the first examples of demotic, vernacular writing in the period. ‘Life writing’ describes narratives that allow us to interrogate how far ideas of self were fashioned by and through various forms of written representation, and to examine the stylistic, generic and social parameters to the formation of identities. Life writings comprise new, hybrid and emerging forms over the period 1500-1700, developing from relatively ‘static’ modes such as saints lives, eulogies, encomia, into more dynamic forms like biography, autobiography, chronicle histories, prison writing, prophecy, sermons, diaries, elegies, monumental verse, and letters. The conference aims to provide a more nuanced account of the emergence, creation and reception of narratives of the self, focussing not just on content, but on narrative, generic and material frameworks that inflect the representation of the “self” according to variables such as gender, class, region, language and religion.

The key questions that we hope that contributors will address include:
1. How do we define “life writing” and what kinds of narratives, texts and artifacts might it include?
2. What are the critical differences between biographically based criticism and the investigation of self writing/narrativization of selves?
3. What are the specific conditions (historical, cultural, local, religious/confessional, familial) that enable the emergence of life writing over the course of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries? Why then?
4. How useful is standard periodisation for thinking about the emergence of these hybrid, complex forms from (mostly) domestic spaces?
5. How significant is it that women writers and subjects are so strongly represented in life writing, and what is at stake in these representations?
6. How might texts which are generically distinct from life writing be read through this framework, e.g. poems, romances, polemic etc?
7. What role does editing, transmission and circulation play in the construction and reception of life writing?
8. What light might comparative perspectives from other languages and cultures offer?

We welcome contributions from established and early career researchers, and encourage papers that address non-Anglophone writings, although papers will be delivered in English.

Papers (20 minutes) on the following topics are particularly welcome:
– memorialization
– exemplarity
– forms/modes/genres/language choices
– materiality/transmission
– privacy/publication
– historical contextualisation(s)
– authorship/collaboration
– community
– spirituality/religion/proselytising

Proposals (comprising a title, 200 word abstract, up to 5 keywords, and a 100 word bio) should be sent to: lifewriting@ucd.ie by Friday March 16th 2018.

Organisers: Prof. Danielle Clarke (School Of English, Drama & Film, UCD) and Prof. John McCafferty (School of History, UCD).

[Image credit: Print by Andrea Meldolla – mid-sixteenth century (Trustees British Museum)]

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New IRC opportunities for early/mid-career – Laureate Awards

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Laureate Awards Programme: CALL NOW OPEN

A consensus has emerged in recent years that Ireland’s research and innovation framework contains a significant gap, namely opportunities for exceptional researchers to conduct frontier basic research across all disciplines beyond postdoctoral level. Innovation2020 affirms the existence of the critical gap in the Irish landscape and recommends the establishment of a frontier research funding programme, to be administered by the Irish Research Council.

Funding to launch the first iteration of the programme was made available by the Minister for Education and Skills under the 2017 budget. For the first iteration of the Irish Research Council Laureate Awards programme, the Council is inviting applications at the early and mid-career level (Starting and Consolidator). Funding will be awarded on the basis solely of excellence, assessed through a rigorous and independent international peer-review process. Laureates will enhance their track record and international competitiveness. As well as the benefits for the laureate and their team, it is anticipated that the award will enhance the potential for subsequent ERC success as a further career milestone; indeed it will be a requirement of all laureates that they make a follow-on application to the ERC.

The aims and objectives of the Irish Research Council Laureate Awards programme are as follows:

  • To enhance frontier basic research in Irish research-performing organisations, across all disciplines.
  • To support exceptional researchers to develop their track record, appropriate to their discipline and career stage.
  • To build the international competitiveness of awardees and Ireland as a whole.
  • To leverage greater success for the Irish research system in European Research Council awards.
  • To retain excellent researchers in the Irish system and to catalyse opportunities for talented researchers currently working outside Ireland, to relocate to Ireland.

Deadline: 29 June, 2017

Further details: http://www.research.ie/scheme/laureate-awards-programme

 

CFP: Borderlines XXI in UCC

University College Cork will host Borderlines XXI in April 2017. The theme of this year’s conference is “Authority in the Medieval and Early Modern World”.

Postgraduates and early career scholars are most welcome to submit an abstract and attend this annual Medieval-Renaissance conference. The Call For Papers has been launched (see below) and the deadline for submission of abstracts is 3rd February 2017.

For updates and further details, see the Borderlines XXI blog here.

borderlines-xxi-ucc-april-2017-cfp

Job: Research Fellow – Performing Restoration Shakespeare

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Research Fellow – Performing Restoration Shakespeare

Queen’s University Belfast – School of Arts, English and Languages

This post is available for three years to be an active member of the AHRC-funded research project ‘Performing Restoration Shakespeare’, assisting the Principal Investigator (Professor Richard Schoch, Queen’s University Belfast) and the International Co-Investigator (Professor Amanda Eubanks Winkler, Syracuse University, USA) in the planning, delivery and evaluation of research and impact activities.

Anticipated interview date: Wednesday 7 December 2016

Apply online at www.qub.ac.uk/jobs. For further information or assistance contact the Personnel Department, Queen’s University Belfast, BT7 1NN. Telephone (028) 9097 3044 or email on personnel@qub.ac.uk.

The University is committed to equality of opportunity and to selection on merit.  It therefore welcomes applications from all sections of society and particularly welcomes applications from people with a disability.

From: www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AUX427/research-fellow-performing-restoration-shakespeare

Internship: Marsh’s Library

Marshs

Marsh’s Library is looking for an intern to work in our Rare Books Reading Room. The successful candidate will already have a postgraduate library qualification, and will gain valuable experience in:

– supervising academic readers and students

– cataloguing of rare books

– handling and retrieval of rare books

– dealing with general library administrative duties

– using social media to promote a cultural attraction

The internship is offered as part of the Jobbridge programme.
If you would like more details please see http://tinyurl.com/oybznfu

Closing date for applications is 28 November 2014 at 5pm.

Details available here.

Job: Queen’s University Fellowship Scheme

QUB’s new Research Fellowship Scheme has been established to attract outstanding and ambitious researchers from across the globe to join Queen’s University. The support that will be available for the Fellows is exceptional enabling them to become leaders in their field. Queen’s Fellows will initiate, develop and manage high level research projects in line with the University’s research strategy. As such the scheme is aligned to the University’s vision that is based on world class leadership in the pursuit of excellence which is relevant to society.

This prestigious four year Research Fellowship is a fantastic opportunity to build upon the foundations of an academic career and will lead to an academic post, subject to performance. The purpose of the scheme is to support the Fellows in pursuing their research. There will be a lighter teaching load and administration responsibilities during the award. Some teaching responsibilities will be introduced into the role to ensure the post-holder can transition appropriately to an academic post.

To support our ambitious research strategy we are currently making a substantial investment in our priority research areas and expect to award 20 fellowships at this time.

Full details about the post are available in the Job Details.

This scheme includes a ‘Collaborative Humanities’ strand.

Deadline, Friday October 17, 2014. See website for more details.

Workshop: Applying for Academic Positions & Research Funding

UCD

This workshop will provide early stage researchers (PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and post-PhD
scholars) with practical guidance about how to build an international research profile, apply for
academic positions, and identify research funding opportunities.

Panellists will include academics from Europe, the USA and Canada, who have experience interviewing candidates for academic positions, and applying for and assessing applications for research funding.

The workshop will begin with brief presentations by two panels of guest speakers, after which there will be time for questions and discussion. Each of the presenters will give short talks about their work in the area of their presentation, focusing particularly on the practicalities involved. There will be ample time for questions and discussion following the presentations.

The second half of the workshop will provide delegates with an opportunity to book individual (15-minute) appointments with one of the guest speakers. These meetings will give each delegate time to discuss questions and concerns specific to her/his situation.

DATE & TIME
Tuesday 10 June 2014 @ 9.15 am-1 pm

VENUE
Room H204, Humanities Institute, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4
Web: http://www.ucd.ie/humanities
A campus map is available to download here: http://www.ucd.ie/maps

REGISTRATION
Registration is free and is open to postgraduate students and postdoctoral researchers from
all Colleges within UCD and from other universities. Places are limited so pre-registration is
necessary. Registration operates on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. To register, send the
following details to both noreen.giffney@ucd.ie and anne.mulhall@ucd.ie

1. Delegate’s name, School/ Department and University where registered, supervisor’s/
mentor’s name
2. PhD/ postdoctoral project working title and short description of research topic (c.
150 words)
3. Short biographical statement (c. 150 words), including research interests,
conference/ seminar presentations, teaching experience, and publications (These
should be included in paragraph format in the 150 words)
4. Whether you are registering to attend the workshop only or if you would like to
make an appointment with one of the panellists in the afternoon.

Further particulars, including details of speakers: 10.06.2014 Applying for Academic Positions and Research Funding