Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference at Queen’s University Belfast

The 8th Annual Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference will take place at Queen’s University, Belfast on 24 – 25 August 2018

The programme for this year’s conference is available to download here.

Plenary addresses will be delivered by Dr David Edwards (University College Cork) and Dr Deana Rankin (Royal Holloway, University of London).

Registration for this year’s conference is now open.

  • Registration Only (Student/Unwaged): £15
  • Registration Only (Full Fee): £25
  • Registration and Conference Dinner (Student/Unwaged): £42.50
  • Registration and Conference Dinner (Full Fee): £52.50

Online registration is available via the QUB online portal. Please see the TSI conference webpage for details on how to register.

Contact: If you have any queries relating to this year’s conference, please email the organisers at: 2018@tudorstuartireland.com

Info from TSI website.

tsi-conference-poster-2018

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British Shakespeare Association Conference at Queen’s University Belfast, 14-17th June

[Quoted from BSA website.]

2018 BSA Conference – 14-17th June 2018 at Queen’s University Belfast

Following on from the 2016 celebrations, the 2018 BSA conference offers an opportunity for academics, practitioners enthusiasts and teachers (primary, secondary and sixth- form teachers and college lecturers) to reflect upon Shakespeare Studies today.

What does Shakespeare Studies mean in the here-and-now? What are the current and anticipated directions in such diverse fields of enquiry as Shakespeare and pedagogy, Shakespeare and race, Shakespeare and the body, Shakespeare and childhood, Shakespeare and religion, Shakespeare and economics, Shakespeare and the law, Shakespeare and emotion, Shakespeare and politics, Shakespeare and war and Shakespeare and the environment? What is Shakespeare’s place inside the curriculum and inside debates around theory, queer studies and feminism? Where are we in terms of editing and materiality, and where does Shakespeare sit alongside his contemporaries, male and female? How does theatre practice, performance history, adaptation, cinema and citation figure in ever evolving Shakespeare Studies?

In particular, this conference is keen to explore the challenges facing Shakespeare Studies today and to reflect on newer emergent approaches. 

Plenary Speakers include: Prof. Pascale Aebischer (University of Exeter), Prof. Clara Calvo (University of Murcia), Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Courtney Lehmann (University of the Pacific), and Prof. Ayanna Thompson (George Washington University).

UK Premieres include: Veeram (dir. Jayaraj, 2016), a South Indian film adaptation of Macbeth, and Hermia and Helena (dir. Matías Piñeiro, 2016), an Argentine adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

BSA 2018 also includes: Q+As with theatre director Andrea Montgomery (The Belfast Tempest, 2016) and film directors Jayaraj and Matías Piñeiro.

For more information contact BSA2018@qub.ac.uk

For details on the programme,etc. and to register, see QUB website here.

[Quoted from BSA website.]

[Image from The Belfast Tempest (dir. Andrea Montgomery, 2016), Terra Nova Productions. Courtesy of Neil Harrison (models Sean Brown and Louise Parker).]


 

Renaissance Re-enactment: The Visit of Archduke Ferdinand of Hapsburg to Kinsale in 1518

500 years ago Archduke Ferdinand of Habsburg arrived in Kinsale, Co. Cork, having been blown off course whilst sailing from Spain to the Low Countries. He and his party spent four days in June 1518 resting and resupplying in Ireland’s southernmost medieval town. The population provided a very hospitable welcome and even more so when they discovered that the Prince was on board. The chronicle of the voyage gives a colourful account of the royal party’s time in Ireland commenting on the dress, culture, and music of the people. Ferdinand succeeded his brother Charles V as Holy Roman Emperor in 1558.

At noon on Saturday 9th June we commemorate this event which connects us to the high politics of Europe. This will involve a short parade along the Pier Road from the Galleon Mast and a recreation of a meeting between the town councillors, townspeople, gallowglasses and the Archduke’s party as took place at the time, followed by complementary historical talks in the Temperance Hall during the afternoon.

Renaissance Re-enactment

Photo opportunities: 10:30am at St. Multose Church and 11am at Desmond Castle

12 noon: A pageant from the Galleon Mast, Pier Road to Market Quay to recreate encounters with townspeople, gallowglasses and poet.

2pm to 5pm: Talks at Temperance Hall (see poster and website below for details.)

For more on this event, see Kinsale.ie here.

For more on Ireland and 1518, see the website here.

Kinsale 1518 Archduke reenactment 2018

 

TV: King Lear on BBC2 – Monday 28th May

BBC2 will broadcast King Lear with an all-star cast on Monday 28th May 2018. Directed by Richard Eyre, Sir Anthony Hopkins stars as the titular monarch with Emma Thompson as Goneril, Emily Watson as Regan, and Florence Pugh as Cordelia.

Other key players include Jim Broadbent as Gloucester, Christopher Eccleston as Oswald, John Macmillan as the nefarious Edmund, and Irish actor Andrew Scott as Edgar. A co-production between Amazon and BBC, this film is set in an alternative 21st century Britain and is directed by Richard Eyre (The Hollow Crown).

For more, see the BBC website here.

Shakespeare’s Fourth Folio at Maynooth University Library

MU Library Treasures

Barbara McCormack, Special Collections Librarian

Shakespeare Portrait of William Shakespeare from the ‘Fourth Folio’

Shakespeare’s Fourth Folio, printed in 1685, will be on display outside the Special Collections Reading Room in the John Paul II Library during May 2018.

The fourth edition of Shakespeare’s Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies, more commonly known as the Fourth Folio, was printed for Herringman, Brewster and Bentley ‘at the Anchor in the New Exchange, the Crane in St. Paul’s Church-Yard, and in Russell-Street Covent-Garden’ in the year 1685. The Fourth Folio was printed just twenty-two years after the printing of the Third Folio, many copies of which were destroyed during the Great Fire of London in 1666. The text features the engraved portrait of Shakespeare by Martin Droedshout which appears opposite the title page. It also includes the original dedication to William Earl of Pembroke and his brother Philip E. of Montgomery by compilers of…

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The Early History of Printing and Philanthropy in Cork – The River-side

The River-side welcomes Garret Cahill’s guest post on the early history of printing and philanthropy in Cork. 2018 marks European Year of Cultural Heritage and, relatedly, the Jubilee of Johannes Gutenberg (c.1440-1468), the father of European printing, who died 550 … Continue reading →

Source: The Early History of Printing and Philanthropy in Cork – The River-side

Review: Julius Caesar – National Theatre Live

The National Theatre’s Julius Caesar, screened in cinemas around Ireland on March 22nd, opened with the usual live screening announcements. Microphone in hand, the announcer informed us of the running time, advertised upcoming NT events, and cautioned us about the show’s use of strobe lighting. Rather than being bland or routine however, these pronouncements were presented in the manner of a roving reporter caught in the middle of Caesar’s raucous political rally. Standing amongst the audience, and almost drowned out by the rock band playing in the background, the announcer even signed off by declaring that she was “off to join the rabble. Hail Caesar!” With the camera moving amongst the audience, the action seemed immediate and pointedly familiar. From the get go then, this production of Julius Caesar was captivating and creative.

The early scenes smoothly introduced the main players. A triumphant Caesar entered surrounded by flags and banners espousing his campaign slogan “Do this!”. Sporting a leather jacket and baseball cap, and assuredly pressing the flesh, Caesar resembled the American presidential candidates we’ve seen on our screen in recent years. Wearing a “Do this!” t-shirt, Marc Antony was clearly in Caesar’s camp and had a strong filial bond with the elder statesman. Brutus, ever the intellectual, signed copies of his book, worked late in his study, and emphasised his thoughts on tyranny by gesticulating with his spectacles.

Michelle Fairley as Cassius - Julius Caesar at the Bridge Theatre - Photo Credit Manuel Harlan

Michelle Fairley as Cassius – Julius Caesar at the Bridge Theatre – Photo Credit Manuel Harlan

As strong as these performances were, by David Calder, David Morrissey, and Ben Whishaw respectively, Michelle Fairley’s Cassius was an absolute revelation. Fairley will be familiar to many as Catelyn Stark in Game of Thrones, and her performance as Cassius was no less compelling and formidable. On several occasions, Cassius’ scenes were the stand out moments of the production. The gender switch enabled Caesar’s complaints about Cassius in 1.2 to assume new significance. Cassius rolled her eyes as Caesar, for the umpteenth time we imagine, commented openly on her appearance and qualities, begging to have “men about me that are fat” rather than slim women who think too much and are hungry for freedom. Meeting the sardonic Casca, played by Adjoa Andoh, the conspiring pair seemed to channel both the femme fatales and hard-bitten heroes of film noir to produce a scene heavy with gloom and menace. When Cassius and Brutus squabbled after the assassination, they recalled the Macbeths, dismayed at the turn of events and unable to wash the blood from their hands. (In the squalor of their ruined shelter, Brutus still found time to apply some hand-sanitiser!) In her suicide, Cassius was as proud, defiant, and pitiable as Cleopatra in her death.

david_morrissey_mark_anthony_-_julius_caesar_at_the_bridge_theatre_-_photo_credit_manuel_harlan_2

David Morrissey as Antony – Julius Caesar at the Bridge Theatre – Photo credit: Manuel Harlan

As Brutus ascended the stage of the Forum to explain the conspirators’ actions, it seemed his work would be cut out for him. Citizens – co-opted members of the audience and stagehands – waved posters of Caesar and shouted their displeasure. Gradually though, as Brutus’ speech continued, the posters were lowered as if the protesting citizens were won over or, more likely, the audience was simply tired holding the images aloft. Whereas Brutus had gripped his microphone like a TV evangelist, Antony quickly discarded it, preferring to speak his eulogy directly to the audience. In his pose as a simple man reluctantly moved to defend Caesar, Antony was wholly convincing. Only later, when he was pleased at the citizens’ planned “mischief” and when he swaggered in his combat gear with Octavius, did Antony suddenly seem two-faced. With deafening gunfire, the debris of urban warfare, and the uniforms and weapons of modern armies, the production’s battle scenes recalled those of Fiennes’ Coriolanus (2011). These action scenes came to a swift end as Antony and Octavius discovered the bodies of Cassius and Brutus. With victory secured, Octavius showed himself to be every inch the arrogant commander. Standing at the stage’s highest point, he stripped off some of his combat gear and, Nixon-like, gave peace signs to his people as celebratory balloons fell. The production ended as it began, with a PR exercise by a savvy politician and Rome’s fate standing on shaky ground.

It was evident that the NT Julius Caesar gripped the theatre and the cinema audience from beginning to end. With superb performances from the main players, supporting cast, and the co-opted audience members (volunteers? victims?) and with a running time of just over 2 hours, this is a pacey and timely production certain to entertain.

There will be encore screenings of the National Theatre’s Julius Caesar at:

Light House Cinema, Dublin, on Tuesday 27 March.

Cork Opera House on Wednesday 28 March.

For tickets here and in other locations, see the NT Live website here.