Call for Papers: Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference, Maynooth University

Thursday, 5 July 2018, 09:00 – Sunday, 8 July 2018, 22:00
Department of Music, Logic House, Maynooth University

Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference: Call for papers (deadline for proposals 4 December 2017)

The Music Department at Maynooth University is pleased to host the 2018 Medieval and Renaissance Music Conference. The Conference will take place from 5th to 8th July 2018, it is envisaged that  we will be able to include c.170 papers.

We welcome papers and themed session on any relevant topic, from performing and recording early music in the twenty-first century, to madrigal studies, sources studies, analytical studies, medieval and renaissance music in Ireland, to mention only a few. In view of recent political events and across the world, however, as a committee, we would like to suggest at least one topic and create space to consider the politics around researching, teaching and performing Med & Ren music in a time when racists, white nationalists (not only in the US) and xenophobes feel emboldened. How do we teach Med & Ren music courses that do not appear to be safe havens for white supremacists? That challenge ahistorical views of Med & Ren as all white (male) and Christian? What resources do we need? What stories are we not telling? What does intersectional, postcolonial, and/or anti-racist research, teaching and music-making look like or sound like in our field? What are the structural barriers to inclusivity and diversity in our field, and what can we do to remove them? We feel this is an important topic for our research fields, but it is not intended as a conference theme in any restrictive way and we would like to stress of course, that all themes and topics will be considered with equal interest.

Possible formats of presentation include, but are not limited to:

  • individual papers of 20 minutes
  • paired papers (60 minutes including QA)
  • themed sessions (120 minutes for 4 papers and 90 minutes for 3 papers, including QA)
  • round tables
  • workshops/ lecture-recitals
  • posters
  • short 10-minute presentations

Conference languages: German, English, French, Italian, Spanish

All proposals should include:

  • title
  • indication of format
  • proposer’s name
  • proposer’s affiliation (if any)
  • names and affiliations of any additional participants
  • contact email
  • AV requirements
  • a short bio or bios of the participants (max. 15 lines; this has no bearing on the evaluation but simply for distribution to chairs)

Abstract:

  • for individual contributions : c. 250 words
  • for sessions with multiple participants: c. 200 words on the proposal as a whole, and c. 100 words on the contribution of each participant

Deadline for all proposals: 4 December 2017.

Notification of acceptance: by 31 January 2018.

Proposals to be submitted to MedRen2018@mu.ie

General Information

The committee would like to support academic parenting. As such, a room with a fridge will be available as lactation room. The room is located on the first floor of Logic House (accessible via staircases),  the same building where the main sessions will take place.

Committee

Antonio Cascelli (Maynooth University, Ireland)
Eleanor Giraud (University of Limerick, Ireland)
Frank Lawrence (University College Dublin, Ireland)
Melanie Marshall (University College Cork, Ireland)
Thomas Schmidt (University of Manchester/ University of Huddersfield)

For information contact: MedRen2018@mu.ie

SaveSave

Advertisements

Call for Papers: British Shakespeare Association, Queen’s Belfast, 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS

Shakespeare Studies Today

Queen’s University Belfast, 14-17 June 2018 (BSA2018@qub.ac.uk)

The Belfast Tempest

Shakespeare Studies is one of the most rich and dynamic areas of interdisciplinary enquiry. It embraces historical explorations of Shakespeare’s canon, ranges across four hundred years of world theatre and performance history, and is continually renewed by Shakespeare’s iconic status in contemporary culture, film and media. Shakespeare draws together academics, teachers, theatre professionals, practitioners, readers and enthusiasts. At the same time, Shakespeare is a global commodity, reinvented in every culture and nation, meaning that his work prompts world-wide conversation. Following on from the 2016 celebrations, the 2018 BSA conference offers an opportunity for academics, practitioners enthusiasts and teachers (primary, secondary and sixth- form teachers and college lecturers) to reflect upon Shakespeare Studies today. What does Shakespeare Studies mean in the here-and-now? What are the current and anticipated directions in such diverse fields of enquiry as Shakespeare and pedagogy, Shakespeare and race, Shakespeare and the body, Shakespeare and childhood, Shakespeare and religion, Shakespeare and economics, Shakespeare and the law, Shakespeare and emotion, Shakespeare and politics, Shakespeare and war and Shakespeare and the environment? What is Shakespeare’s place inside the curriculum and inside debates around theory, queer studies and feminism? Where are we in terms of editing and materiality, and where does Shakespeare sit alongside his contemporaries, male and female? How does theatre practice, performance history, adaptation, cinema and citation figure in ever evolving Shakespeare Studies? In particular, this conference is keen to explore the challenges facing Shakespeare Studies today and to reflect on newer emergent approaches. Reflections on past practices and their reinventions for the future are also warmly welcomed.

Plenary Speakers include: Prof. Pascale Aebischer (University of Exeter), Prof. Clara Calvo (University of Murcia), Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast), Prof. Courtney Lehmann (University of the Pacific) and Prof. Ayanna Thompson (George Washington University).

UK Premieres include: Veeram (dir. Jayaraj, 2016), a South Indian film adaptation of Macbeth, and Hermia and Helena (dir. Matías Piñeiro, 2016), an Argentine adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

BSA 2018 also includes: Q+As with theatre director Andrea Montgomery (The Belfast Tempest, 2016) and film directors Jayaraj and Matías Piñeiro.

There are four ways to participate in BSA 2018:

  1. Submit an abstract for a 20-minute paper. Abstracts (100 words) and a short biography to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to BSA2018@qub.ac.uk
  2. Submit a proposal for a panel session consisting of three 20-minute papers. Abstracts for all three papers (100 words each), a rationale for the panel (100 words) and short speaker biographies to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to BSA2018@qub.ac.uk
  3. Submit a proposal for a performance / practice or education workshop or a teachers’ INSET session. For a workshop, submit a summary proposal outlining aims and activities and a biographical statement. For an INSET session (either a one-hour event or a twenty-minute slot), submit a summary proposal and biographical statement. All proposals to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to BSA2018@qub.ac.uk
  4. Submit an abstract to join a seminar. The seminar format involves circulating a short paper in advance of the conference and then meeting to discuss all of the papers in Belfast. Abstracts (100 words), a short biography and a statement of your seminar of preference to be submitted by 1 October 2017 to BSA2018@qub.ac.ukSeminars include:

Digital Shakespeare: Histories/Resources/Methods’ led by Dr Stephen O’Neill (Maynooth University);

Shakespeare and Act/Scene Division’ led by Dr Mark Hutchings (University of Reading);

‘Shakespeare and the Book Today’ led by Prof. Emma Smith (Hertford College, Oxford);

‘Shakespeare and his Contemporaries’ led by Dr Lucy Munro (King’s College, London);

Shakespeare and Early Modern Playing Spaces’ led by Prof. Richard Dutton (Queen’s University Belfast);

‘Shakespeare and Europe’ led by Prof. Andrew Hiscock (Bangor University) and Prof. Natalie Vienne-Guerrin (University of Montpellier III-Paul Valéry);

Shakespeare and Film’ led by Dr Romano Mullin (Queen’s University Belfast);

‘Shakespeare and Marx’ led by Dr Matt Williamson (Queen’s University Belfast);

‘Shakespeare and Morality’ led by Dr Neema Parvini (University of Surrey);

‘Shakespeare and Pedagogy’ led by Dr Lindzy Brady (University of Sydney) and Dr Kate Flaherty (Australian National University);

‘Shakespeare, Performance and the 21st Century’ led by Dr Erin Sullivan (Shakespeare Institute, the University of Birmingham);

‘Shakespeare and Religion’ led by Dr Adrian Streete (University of Glasgow);

‘Women, Shakespeare and Performance’, led by Prof. Liz Schafer (Royal Holloway, University of London)

A number of Postgraduate / Practitioner / Teacher Bursaries will be available to cover the conference fee. When you submit your abstract / proposal, please indicate if you would like to apply for one of these and if you would like to attend all of the conference or Saturday only.

 

The BSA is proud to announce its next the locations, institutional partners and themes of its next three conferences:

Shakespeare Studies Today, 14-17 June 2018, Queen’s University, Belfast

Shakespeare: Race and Nation, July 2019, Swansea University

Shakespeare in Action, July 2020, University of Surrey

The BSA is pleased to invite proposals to host our 2021 conference.

To apply, send a completed proposal form to events@britishshakespeare.ws

Download the Proposal Form

More info: http://www.britishshakespeare.ws/conference/

CFP: Writing the History of Britain and Ireland – The Use, Writing, and Reception of History, 1500-1700

Capture

Writing the History of Britain and Ireland: The Use, Writing, and Reception of History, 1500-1700

Institute of Historical Research, London

1 October 2016

This colloquium is a one-day interdisciplinary and cross-period event. Its focus is on the use, writing and reception of History in early modern Britain and Ireland, and the relationship between history and collective and ‘public’ memories, the construction of national, regional, political and religious identities, and the interdependence of history with custom and social practices.  The fields of memory studies and the history of history-writing have attracted much scholarly interest in recent years, together with scrutiny of the practices of commemoration and ‘public history’. These themes provide the core questions for this colloquium.

The colloquium will examine the variety of ways in which antiquarians, scholars and writers used ancient and medieval material to construct narratives relevant to their own time. The refashioning of ‘older’ styles such as chronicles and genealogies also contributed to a reworking of the past for present ends. These sources and narratives had a range of purposes, from political persuasion, family memorialisation, recording the history of one’s region, and the building of national and religious identities, often alongside and intertwined with these family and regional interests. There have been several significant explorations in the area of both history-writing and memory by English scholars, including Noah Millstone, David Cressy, Andy Wood and Alexandra Walsham. However, there has been a comparable lack of scholarship on these interrelated topics among historians of Wales, Ireland and Scotland. Despite the strong bardic and antiquarian traditions in Wales and Ireland, and the continuous production of historical writing from at least the medieval period onwards, there has been very little attention paid to the issue. This colloquium will aim to address this neglect, while including England both as part of a Three Kingdoms/Four Nations approach. We also hope to develop, through debate and mutual learning, the foundations of a comparative and methodological framework for Welsh, Irish and Scottish scholars in exploring the uses of history.

Keynote speakers include Professor Andy Wood (University of Durham) and Professor Raymond Gillespie (Maynooth University).

Paper topics may include but are by no means limited to:

  • The use of ancient and medieval manuscripts in early modern history-writing
  • Chronicles and their continued use and adaptation
  • History-writing and national/regional identities
  • History and polemic: politicising the past
  • Religious identities and the practice of religious history
  • Custom, social memory and the writing of history
  • The practice of history in early modern Britain and Ireland
  • Memorialisation and commemoration of historical events and persons in the early modern period

We invite prospective speakers of all career levels to submit abstracts for 20-minute papers.

Abstracts should be no more than 300 words, with a paper title and affiliation, to be submitted by 30 June 2016.

More information available on the website: earlymodernhistorywriting.wordpress.com

 

 

CFP: Early Modern Orders & Disorders

Wheel_of_fortune

‘Wheel of Fortune’, Durer

Early Modern Orders and Disorders: Religious Orders and British and Irish Catholicism

Dates: 28–30 June 2017

Venue: University of Notre Dame’s London Gateway, London, UK.

Conference Organizers: Brad Gregory (Notre Dame), James Kelly (Durham), Susannah Monta (Notre Dame)

Speakers include:

Caroline Bowden (QMUL)

John McCafferty (UCD)

Thomas McCoog (Fordham)

Susannah Monta (Notre Dame)

Thomas O’Connor (Maynooth)

Michael Questier (QMUL)

Alison Shell (UCL)

 

Call for Papers

The third biannual Early Modern British and Irish Catholicism conference, jointly hosted by Durham University and the University of Notre Dame, will concentrate on the relationship between religious orders and British and Irish Catholicism. A wealth of recent scholarship has focussed on the activities of both male and female religious following the upheavals of the sixteenth century. This conference will consider the relationship between religious orders and those on the western peripheries of Catholic Europe. These relationships are to be explored in the widest possible framework, including through the religious orders as links between English, Irish, Scottish and Welsh Catholics, and the global Church; British and Irish religious in exile; the presence of members of religious orders in Britain and Ireland; memories of pre-Reformation religious orders such as in the landscape; religious orders in the non-Catholic imagination; the views of Britain and Ireland held by religious orders and their international membership. The timeframe being considered is broad, from c.1530 to 1800.

 

The conference is interdisciplinary and welcomes papers from researchers in fields including History, Literary Studies, Theology, Philosophy, Musicology and Art History.

We invite proposals for 20 minute communications on any related theme from any field. Panel proposals consisting of three speakers are also encouraged.

 

Please send proposals (c. 200 words) by email to Cormac Begadon (cormac.begadon@durham.ac.uk) by 27 January 2017 at the latest.

For questions relating to booking and travel, please contact Hannah Thomas (hannah.thomas2@durham.ac.uk).

For general queries relating to the conference, please contact James Kelly (james.kelly3@durham.ac.uk).

 

This Call for Papers was taken from https://www.dur.ac.uk/theology.religion/ccs/new/?itemno=27932

 

CFP deadline Fri 15 April: Tudor and Stuart Ireland

A reminder that the deadline for proposals to the Tudor and Stuart Ireland conference is this Friday, 15 April 2016.

This year the conference will feature a special panel on Shakespeare and Ireland.

Screen Shot 2016-04-12 at 13.19.09

The 6th Annual Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference will be held at the National University of Ireland, Galway, on 19-20 August 2016.  This year’s programme will feature plenary speakers Prof. Mary O’Dowd (Queen’s University Belfast), and Prof. Andrew Hadfield (University of Sussex), as well as a special panel session ‘Shakespeare and Ireland’.

Call for Papers

Proposals for papers (20 minutes) are now welcome on any aspect of Ireland or the Irish abroad during the Tudor and Stuart periods, including:

♦ Print, propaganda, and public opinion
♦ Gender and society
♦ Poetry, literature, and song
♦ Ireland in a comparative/European context
♦ Political and economic history
♦ Material culture and the arts
♦ Religious/ecclesiastical history
♦ Writing (and rewriting) the past
♦ Public engagement, heritage, and early modern Ireland
♦ Ethnicity and identity
♦ Innovation and change
♦ Mobility, migration, and the Irish abroad

Postgraduates, postdoctoral scholars, early-career researchers, independent researchers, and scholars from the disciplines of English, Irish, archaeology, art history, theology, philosophy, music, and Irish studies are particularly welcome to submit proposals for consideration. Proposals that include an interdisciplinary element are strongly encouraged.

Abstracts of 250 words can be submitted by clicking here.

The call for papers will close on 15 April 2016


support banner TSI
The 6th Annual Tudor & Stuart Ireland Interdisciplinary Conference is generously supported by the President’s Award for Excellence in Research (awarded to Prof. Steven Ellis), NUI Galway, the Moore Institute, NUI Galway, the Discipline of History, NUI Galway and the Society for Renaissance Studies.

CFP: Moments of Becoming: Transitions and Transformations in Early Modern Europe

Moments of Becoming: Transitions and Transformations in Early Modern Europe  

Conference dates: 20-21 November 2015.

Venue: University of Limerick, Ireland.

The aim of this interdisciplinary conference is to explore the theme of ‘becoming’ in early modern European and Irish culture. The early modern period itself is often understood as a time of transition, but how did the people of the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries experience periods of transformation/transition in their own lives and work, and how were these processes accomplished and accommodated? Conference papers will explore changes to personal, professional, religious or political identity and identifications, as well as understandings of transformations of state, status and nature more broadly.

Plenary Speakers: Professor Daniel Carey (NUI Galway), Professor Raymond Gillespie (Maynooth University), Professor Alison Rowlands (University of Essex).

We invite proposals for 20-minute papers on themes that might include:

Transition in religion and politics

  • Religious conversion
  • Alterations to political sympathies
  • Migration and naturalisation
  • Becoming a soldier, priest, rebel, martyr, hero or villain

Personal transformations

  • Acquiring competencies, skills or professional training
  • Social mobility, upwards or downwards
  • Becoming a parent
  • Rites of passage

Transition and the supernatural

  • Death and movement to the next world
  • Magical and miraculous transformations

Textual and performative transformations

  • Responses to societal transitions in poetry and prose
  • Transforming texts via translation, printing or performance
  • The use of space and material culture in ceremonial/ritual contexts

Please submit an abstract of about 250 words to Richard Kirwan (Richard.Kirwan@ul.ie) or Clodagh Tait (Clodagh.Tait@mic.ul.ie) before 10th July 2015.

This conference will occur under the auspices of the Limerick Early Modern Forum of the University of Limerick and Mary Immaculate College. The conference is funded by the Irish Research Council New Foundations Scheme. The organisers plan to publish a volume of essays drawn from the conference papers.

For further information see https://emslimerick.wordpress.com