Public talk: “Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper – 3rd December 2019

“Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage”

by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper

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Tuesday 3rd December 2019, at 5pm, 

in the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin

 

As part of the Whitfield Visiting Lecture Series, Trinity’s School of Creative Arts and Department of Drama are proud to present Dr Farah Karim-Cooper (Head of Higher Education and Research, Shakespeare’s Globe, UK) speaking on death, race, and beauty.

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Dr Farah Karim-Cooper

Dr Karim-Cooper’s talk will focus on the representations of death that participate in the development of Renaissance ideals of beauty, virtue and racial superiority in Western Europe. It will pose questions such as: How are Early modern ideas of mortality shaped by encounters with non-white bodies and cultures? And how does Shakespearean tragedy allude to the iconographic polarities of racial distinction when staging death and dying?

Dr Karim-Cooper oversees the Higher Education programme and leads Research and scholarship at Shakespeare’s Globe. She is Visiting Research Fellow, King’s College London and co-convenes the King’s/Globe joint MA in Shakespeare Studies. She was the 2013 Lloyd Davis Visiting Professor at the University of Queensland, a Trustee of the Shakespeare Association of America and Chair of the Globe Architecture Research Group that led the research into the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. She is frequently a keynote speaker and panellist at national and international conferences on Shakespeare, Renaissance drama, early modern culture and theatre practice. Farah curated the Shakespeare and Race Festival in August 2018. Her research interests are theatre history, feminism, critical race theory and performance. Farah is the author of Cosmetics in Shakespearean and Renaissance Drama, revised edition (EUP, 2019), The Hand on the Shakespearean Stage (Bloomsbury, 2016) and Titus Andronicus: The State of Play (Bloomsbury, 2019). She is currently working on a book on Shakespeare, Race and Death and editing The Duchess of Malfi for the Routledge Anthology of Early Modern Drama (forthcoming 2020).

Dr Karim-Cooper’s talk will be followed by the launch of Shakespeare’s Body Language: Shaming Gestures and Gender Politics on the Renaissance Stage, written by Dr Miranda Fay Thomas (Assist. Prof. in Drama, Trinity College Dublin) from 6pm in the Samuel Beckett Theatre Foyer, TCD.

MFT Shakespeares Body Lanaguage book Arden 2019


 

 

CFP – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception – conference at Trinity College Dublin 2020

Trinity College Dublin 24-25 April 2020 Proposals for papers are invited for a conference on The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Keynote Speaker: Professor […]

via Appel à contribution – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception — RMBLF.be

Conference at Trinity Dublin: Borderlines XXIII programme

We’ve finalised the programme for Borderlines Conference 2019, held at Trinity College, Dublin. Click the link for the Borderlines Programme to see the range of fantastic papers set to be presented. Looking forward to seeing you all at the end of the month! Borderlines Committee

via Borderlines XXIII Programme — Borderlines XXIII

Shakespeare’s “Pericles” at the Lir, Dublin

From the Lir website.

This new contemporary adaptation of Pericles at The Lir Academy turns William Shakespeare’s classical tale into a modern-day take on the refugee crisis, in a story of resilience and hope.

When Antiochus, the malign ruler of Syria becomes a threat, Pericles must escape conflict and flee his country, risking his life at sea. In this modern-day adaptation of one of Shakespeare’s Romances, Pericles becomes a refugee, a modern hero. His strength and resilience will be tested by the Gods as he seeks asylum in different lands, meets love, faces loss, and is ultimately restored to his rightful place.

Director Conall Morrison brings a unique spin to a classic text , a remarkable play that fuses struggle and strife with love, magic and redemption.

Note: This production contains strobe lighting, smoke effects and loud noises.

Performances

Friday 8th Feb 7.30pm to Thursday 14th Feb 7.30pm — Studio One
Matinee: Tuesday 12th Feb 1.00pm — Studio One

Ticket info.

See the Lir website here.

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Shakespeare and Neuroscience, Trinity Long Room Hub, 24 May 2018

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24 May 2018 | 16:00 – 18:00 

Trinity Long Room Hub

Shakespeare & Neuroscience

Public lecture by Professor Amy Cook whose book Shakespearean Neuroplay uses Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a test subject and cognitive linguistic theory of conceptual blending as a tool, Cook unravels the ‘mirror held up to nature’ at the center of Shakespeare’s play and provides a methodology for applying cognitive science to the study of drama.  (Registration required)

Further information and registration